Argentina - CO2 emissions

CO2 emissions from gaseous fuel consumption (kt)

The value for CO2 emissions from gaseous fuel consumption (kt) in Argentina was 96,691 as of 2014. As the graph below shows, over the past 54 years this indicator reached a maximum value of 96,691 in 2014 and a minimum value of 2,365 in 1960.

Definition: Carbon dioxide emissions from liquid fuel consumption refer mainly to emissions from use of natural gas as an energy source.

Source: Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center, Environmental Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Tennessee, United States.

See also:

Year Value
1960 2,365
1961 4,034
1962 5,112
1963 5,834
1964 6,472
1965 7,253
1966 7,855
1967 8,214
1968 9,149
1969 9,112
1970 10,290
1971 11,030
1972 12,479
1973 14,199
1974 14,936
1975 15,735
1976 16,480
1977 16,920
1978 16,439
1979 18,031
1980 19,582
1981 20,502
1982 23,267
1983 26,285
1984 27,323
1985 28,834
1986 30,990
1987 36,729
1988 42,266
1989 44,646
1990 43,249
1991 47,323
1992 48,342
1993 40,839
1994 42,713
1995 53,238
1996 57,590
1997 61,554
1998 61,664
1999 67,674
2000 69,493
2001 64,862
2002 62,669
2003 69,127
2004 82,981
2005 82,034
2006 83,938
2007 87,249
2008 90,194
2009 88,067
2010 87,000
2011 92,661
2012 95,459
2013 90,835
2014 96,691

CO2 emissions from gaseous fuel consumption (% of total)

CO2 emissions from gaseous fuel consumption (% of total) in Argentina was 47.39 as of 2014. Its highest value over the past 54 years was 52.66 in 2004, while its lowest value was 4.85 in 1960.

Definition: Carbon dioxide emissions from liquid fuel consumption refer mainly to emissions from use of natural gas as an energy source.

Source: Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center, Environmental Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Tennessee, United States.

See also:

Year Value
1960 4.85
1961 7.88
1962 9.52
1963 11.65
1964 11.61
1965 12.32
1966 12.44
1967 12.53
1968 13.24
1969 11.78
1970 12.44
1971 12.40
1972 13.84
1973 15.09
1974 15.63
1975 16.58
1976 16.51
1977 16.79
1978 16.02
1979 16.29
1980 18.01
1981 20.09
1982 22.50
1983 24.98
1984 25.65
1985 28.66
1986 29.74
1987 31.95
1988 34.79
1989 38.13
1990 38.56
1991 40.41
1992 39.84
1993 34.63
1994 34.89
1995 41.60
1996 42.66
1997 44.60
1998 44.10
1999 46.04
2000 48.89
2001 48.51
2002 50.25
2003 51.18
2004 52.66
2005 50.60
2006 47.84
2007 49.81
2008 47.69
2009 48.94
2010 46.30
2011 48.35
2012 49.63
2013 47.85
2014 47.39

CO2 emissions (kg per 2010 US$ of GDP)

The latest value for CO2 emissions (kg per 2010 US$ of GDP) in Argentina was 0.460 as of 2014. Over the past 54 years, the value for this indicator has fluctuated between 0.588 in 1989 and 0.417 in 2013.

Definition: Carbon dioxide emissions are those stemming from the burning of fossil fuels and the manufacture of cement. They include carbon dioxide produced during consumption of solid, liquid, and gas fuels and gas flaring.

Source: Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center, Environmental Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Tennessee, United States.

See also:

Year Value
1960 0.422
1961 0.420
1962 0.444
1963 0.438
1964 0.442
1965 0.423
1966 0.456
1967 0.459
1968 0.462
1969 0.471
1970 0.489
1971 0.498
1972 0.496
1973 0.504
1974 0.485
1975 0.482
1976 0.517
1977 0.488
1978 0.521
1979 0.509
1980 0.480
1981 0.478
1982 0.510
1983 0.499
1984 0.495
1985 0.505
1986 0.485
1987 0.520
1988 0.564
1989 0.588
1990 0.577
1991 0.535
1992 0.495
1993 0.454
1994 0.445
1995 0.479
1996 0.479
1997 0.453
1998 0.442
1999 0.481
2000 0.469
2001 0.461
2002 0.483
2003 0.480
2004 0.514
2005 0.486
2006 0.487
2007 0.446
2008 0.463
2009 0.468
2010 0.444
2011 0.427
2012 0.433
2013 0.417
2014 0.460

CO2 emissions (kt)

The value for CO2 emissions (kt) in Argentina was 204,025 as of 2014. As the graph below shows, over the past 54 years this indicator reached a maximum value of 204,025 in 2014 and a minimum value of 48,815 in 1960.

Definition: Carbon dioxide emissions are those stemming from the burning of fossil fuels and the manufacture of cement. They include carbon dioxide produced during consumption of solid, liquid, and gas fuels and gas flaring.

Source: Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center, Environmental Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Tennessee, United States.

See also:

Year Value
1960 48,815
1961 51,180
1962 53,696
1963 50,084
1964 55,727
1965 58,866
1966 63,138
1967 65,544
1968 69,083
1969 77,330
1970 82,735
1971 88,939
1972 90,157
1973 94,066
1974 95,569
1975 94,931
1976 99,786
1977 100,791
1978 102,639
1979 110,703
1980 108,738
1981 102,042
1982 103,424
1983 105,214
1984 106,523
1985 100,597
1986 104,213
1987 114,942
1988 121,473
1989 117,091
1990 112,148
1991 117,098
1992 121,352
1993 117,927
1994 122,408
1995 127,964
1996 135,001
1997 138,004
1998 139,815
1999 146,984
2000 142,137
2001 133,721
2002 124,715
2003 135,063
2004 157,589
2005 162,111
2006 175,437
2007 175,176
2008 189,107
2009 179,962
2010 187,919
2011 191,634
2012 192,356
2013 189,852
2014 204,025

CO2 emissions from liquid fuel consumption (kt)

The value for CO2 emissions from liquid fuel consumption (kt) in Argentina was 94,187 as of 2014. As the graph below shows, over the past 54 years this indicator reached a maximum value of 94,187 in 2014 and a minimum value of 40,678 in 1963.

Definition: Carbon dioxide emissions from liquid fuel consumption refer mainly to emissions from use of petroleum-derived fuels as an energy source.

Source: Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center, Environmental Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Tennessee, United States.

See also:

Year Value
1960 41,224
1961 42,156
1962 45,115
1963 40,678
1964 45,247
1965 47,363
1966 48,610
1967 49,813
1968 52,603
1969 60,623
1970 63,978
1971 69,376
1972 69,354
1973 71,268
1974 71,510
1975 68,969
1976 71,925
1977 72,764
1978 72,959
1979 79,138
1980 76,571
1981 70,117
1982 69,086
1983 68,731
1984 67,289
1985 60,487
1986 62,251
1987 66,508
1988 66,285
1989 59,801
1990 59,237
1991 61,283
1992 63,685
1993 67,205
1994 67,260
1995 62,885
1996 65,977
1997 66,923
1998 69,633
1999 72,071
2000 66,875
2001 63,714
2002 57,543
2003 59,405
2004 67,869
2005 71,859
2006 81,979
2007 78,015
2008 88,730
2009 82,449
2010 90,230
2011 86,992
2012 85,672
2013 88,837
2014 94,187

CO2 emissions from liquid fuel consumption (% of total)

CO2 emissions from liquid fuel consumption (% of total) in Argentina was 46.16 as of 2014. Its highest value over the past 54 years was 84.45 in 1960, while its lowest value was 43.07 in 2004.

Definition: Carbon dioxide emissions from liquid fuel consumption refer mainly to emissions from use of petroleum-derived fuels as an energy source.

Source: Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center, Environmental Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Tennessee, United States.

See also:

Year Value
1960 84.45
1961 82.37
1962 84.02
1963 81.22
1964 81.19
1965 80.46
1966 76.99
1967 76.00
1968 76.15
1969 78.40
1970 77.33
1971 78.00
1972 76.93
1973 75.76
1974 74.83
1975 72.65
1976 72.08
1977 72.19
1978 71.08
1979 71.49
1980 70.42
1981 68.71
1982 66.80
1983 65.32
1984 63.17
1985 60.13
1986 59.73
1987 57.86
1988 54.57
1989 51.07
1990 52.82
1991 52.33
1992 52.48
1993 56.99
1994 54.95
1995 49.14
1996 48.87
1997 48.49
1998 49.80
1999 49.03
2000 47.05
2001 47.65
2002 46.14
2003 43.98
2004 43.07
2005 44.33
2006 46.73
2007 44.54
2008 46.92
2009 45.81
2010 48.02
2011 45.40
2012 44.54
2013 46.79
2014 46.16

CO2 emissions (metric tons per capita)

The value for CO2 emissions (metric tons per capita) in Argentina was 4.75 as of 2014. As the graph below shows, over the past 54 years this indicator reached a maximum value of 4.75 in 2014 and a minimum value of 2.32 in 1963.

Definition: Carbon dioxide emissions are those stemming from the burning of fossil fuels and the manufacture of cement. They include carbon dioxide produced during consumption of solid, liquid, and gas fuels and gas flaring.

Source: Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center, Environmental Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Tennessee, United States.

See also:

Year Value
1960 2.37
1961 2.44
1962 2.52
1963 2.32
1964 2.54
1965 2.64
1966 2.79
1967 2.86
1968 2.97
1969 3.28
1970 3.45
1971 3.65
1972 3.64
1973 3.73
1974 3.73
1975 3.64
1976 3.77
1977 3.75
1978 3.76
1979 4.00
1980 3.87
1981 3.57
1982 3.57
1983 3.57
1984 3.56
1985 3.31
1986 3.38
1987 3.67
1988 3.82
1989 3.63
1990 3.43
1991 3.53
1992 3.61
1993 3.46
1994 3.54
1995 3.66
1996 3.81
1997 3.85
1998 3.86
1999 4.01
2000 3.84
2001 3.57
2002 3.29
2003 3.53
2004 4.07
2005 4.14
2006 4.43
2007 4.38
2008 4.68
2009 4.41
2010 4.56
2011 4.60
2012 4.57
2013 4.46
2014 4.75

CO2 emissions (kg per PPP $ of GDP)

The latest value for CO2 emissions (kg per PPP $ of GDP) in Argentina was 0.240 as of 2014. Over the past 24 years, the value for this indicator has fluctuated between 0.490 in 1990 and 0.221 in 2013.

Definition: Carbon dioxide emissions are those stemming from the burning of fossil fuels and the manufacture of cement. They include carbon dioxide produced during consumption of solid, liquid, and gas fuels and gas flaring.

Source: Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center, Environmental Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Tennessee, United States.

See also:

Year Value
1990 0.490
1991 0.440
1992 0.398
1993 0.357
1994 0.342
1995 0.361
1996 0.354
1997 0.329
1998 0.318
1999 0.341
2000 0.325
2001 0.313
2002 0.322
2003 0.314
2004 0.327
2005 0.300
2006 0.291
2007 0.260
2008 0.264
2009 0.265
2010 0.249
2011 0.234
2012 0.233
2013 0.221
2014 0.240

CO2 emissions (kg per 2011 PPP $ of GDP)

The latest value for CO2 emissions (kg per 2011 PPP $ of GDP) in Argentina was 0.253 as of 2014. Over the past 24 years, the value for this indicator has fluctuated between 0.317 in 1990 and 0.229 in 2013.

Definition: Carbon dioxide emissions are those stemming from the burning of fossil fuels and the manufacture of cement. They include carbon dioxide produced during consumption of solid, liquid, and gas fuels and gas flaring.

Source: Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center, Environmental Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Tennessee, United States.

See also:

Year Value
1990 0.317
1991 0.294
1992 0.272
1993 0.249
1994 0.245
1995 0.263
1996 0.263
1997 0.249
1998 0.243
1999 0.264
2000 0.257
2001 0.253
2002 0.265
2003 0.264
2004 0.282
2005 0.267
2006 0.267
2007 0.245
2008 0.254
2009 0.257
2010 0.244
2011 0.234
2012 0.238
2013 0.229
2014 0.253

CO2 emissions from solid fuel consumption (kt)

The value for CO2 emissions from solid fuel consumption (kt) in Argentina was 5,823 as of 2014. As the graph below shows, over the past 54 years this indicator reached a maximum value of 5,823 in 2014 and a minimum value of 1,100 in 2002.

Definition: Carbon dioxide emissions from solid fuel consumption refer mainly to emissions from use of coal as an energy source.

Source: Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center, Environmental Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Tennessee, United States.

See also:

Year Value
1960 3,909
1961 3,542
1962 2,010
1963 2,307
1964 2,560
1965 2,604
1966 2,589
1967 2,941
1968 2,369
1969 2,593
1970 3,289
1971 2,930
1972 2,860
1973 2,882
1974 3,370
1975 3,597
1976 3,242
1977 2,706
1978 3,836
1979 3,605
1980 2,868
1981 2,959
1982 2,662
1983 2,193
1984 2,149
1985 2,776
1986 3,396
1987 3,781
1988 4,026
1989 4,147
1990 3,073
1991 2,692
1992 2,805
1993 2,303
1994 3,564
1995 3,704
1996 3,102
1997 2,780
1998 2,842
1999 2,156
2000 1,657
2001 1,291
2002 1,100
2003 1,991
2004 2,200
2005 3,271
2006 3,869
2007 3,663
2008 3,880
2009 3,234
2010 3,993
2011 4,727
2012 4,327
2013 2,380
2014 5,823

CO2 emissions from solid fuel consumption (% of total)

CO2 emissions from solid fuel consumption (% of total) in Argentina was 2.85 as of 2014. Its highest value over the past 54 years was 8.01 in 1960, while its lowest value was 0.88 in 2002.

Definition: Carbon dioxide emissions from solid fuel consumption refer mainly to emissions from use of coal as an energy source.

Source: Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center, Environmental Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Tennessee, United States.

See also:

Year Value
1960 8.01
1961 6.92
1962 3.74
1963 4.61
1964 4.59
1965 4.42
1966 4.10
1967 4.49
1968 3.43
1969 3.35
1970 3.98
1971 3.29
1972 3.17
1973 3.06
1974 3.53
1975 3.79
1976 3.25
1977 2.69
1978 3.74
1979 3.26
1980 2.64
1981 2.90
1982 2.57
1983 2.08
1984 2.02
1985 2.76
1986 3.26
1987 3.29
1988 3.31
1989 3.54
1990 2.74
1991 2.30
1992 2.31
1993 1.95
1994 2.91
1995 2.89
1996 2.30
1997 2.01
1998 2.03
1999 1.47
2000 1.17
2001 0.97
2002 0.88
2003 1.47
2004 1.40
2005 2.02
2006 2.21
2007 2.09
2008 2.05
2009 1.80
2010 2.13
2011 2.47
2012 2.25
2013 1.25
2014 2.85

GHG net emissions/removals by LUCF (Mt of CO2 equivalent)

Definition: GHG net emissions/removals by LUCF refers to changes in atmospheric levels of all greenhouse gases attributable to forest and land-use change activities, including but not limited to (1) emissions and removals of CO2 from decreases or increases in biomass stocks due to forest management, logging, fuelwood collection, etc.; (2) conversion of existing forests and natural grasslands to other land uses; (3) removal of CO2 from the abandonment of formerly managed lands (e.g. croplands and pastures); and (4) emissions and removals of CO2 in soil associated with land-use change and management. For Annex-I countries under the UNFCCC, these data are drawn from the annual GHG inventories submitted to the UNFCCC by each country; for non-Annex-I countries, data are drawn from the most recently submitted National Communication where available. Because of differences in reporting years and methodologies, these data are not generally considered comparable across countries. Data are in million metric tons.

Source: United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change.

See also:

Year Value
2000 -43.30

CO2 emissions from residential buildings and commercial and public services (% of total fuel combustion)

CO2 emissions from residential buildings and commercial and public services (% of total fuel combustion) in Argentina was 14.46 as of 2014. Its highest value over the past 43 years was 17.54 in 1990, while its lowest value was 10.59 in 1972.

Definition: CO2 emissions from residential buildings and commercial and public services contains all emissions from fuel combustion in households. This corresponds to IPCC Source/Sink Category 1 A 4 b. Commercial and public services includes emissions from all activities of ISIC Divisions 41, 50-52, 55, 63-67, 70-75, 80, 85, 90-93 and 99.

Source: IEA Statistics © OECD/IEA 2014 (http://www.iea.org/stats/index.asp), subject to https://www.iea.org/t&c/termsandconditions/

See also:

Year Value
1971 11.52
1972 10.59
1973 12.76
1974 12.92
1975 13.93
1976 14.33
1977 15.01
1978 14.37
1979 13.66
1980 13.89
1981 15.06
1982 14.28
1983 15.64
1984 16.78
1985 16.28
1986 16.01
1987 16.29
1988 16.39
1989 15.99
1990 17.54
1991 16.24
1992 15.54
1993 15.63
1994 14.59
1995 14.45
1996 13.66
1997 12.76
1998 12.63
1999 13.29
2000 13.95
2001 14.42
2002 14.45
2003 14.19
2004 13.20
2005 13.70
2006 14.38
2007 14.62
2008 13.99
2009 14.45
2010 15.01
2011 13.79
2012 14.28
2013 15.26
2014 14.46

CO2 emissions from electricity and heat production, total (% of total fuel combustion)

CO2 emissions from electricity and heat production, total (% of total fuel combustion) in Argentina was 38.04 as of 2014. Its highest value over the past 43 years was 39.53 in 1988, while its lowest value was 28.26 in 1994.

Definition: CO2 emissions from electricity and heat production is the sum of three IEA categories of CO2 emissions: (1) Main Activity Producer Electricity and Heat which contains the sum of emissions from main activity producer electricity generation, combined heat and power generation and heat plants. Main activity producers (formerly known as public utilities) are defined as those undertakings whose primary activity is to supply the public. They may be publicly or privately owned. This corresponds to IPCC Source/Sink Category 1 A 1 a. For the CO2 emissions from fuel combustion (summary) file, emissions from own on-site use of fuel in power plants (EPOWERPLT) are also included. (2) Unallocated Autoproducers which contains the emissions from the generation of electricity and/or heat by autoproducers. Autoproducers are defined as undertakings that generate electricity and/or heat, wholly or partly for their own use as an activity which supports their primary activity. They may be privately or publicly owned. In the 1996 IPCC Guidelines, these emissions would normally be distributed between industry, transport and "other" sectors. (3) Other Energy Industries contains emissions from fuel combusted in petroleum refineries, for the manufacture of solid fuels, coal mining, oil and gas extraction and other energy-producing industries. This corresponds to the IPCC Source/Sink Categories 1 A 1 b and 1 A 1 c. According to the 1996 IPCC Guidelines, emissions from coke inputs to blast furnaces can either be counted here or in the Industrial Processes source/sink category. Within detailed sectoral calculations, certain non-energy processes can be distinguished. In the reduction of iron in a blast furnace through the combustion of coke, the primary purpose of the coke oxidation is to produce pig iron and the emissions can be considered as an industrial process. Care must be taken not to double count these emissions in both Energy and Industrial Processes. In the IEA estimations, these emissions have been included in this category.

Source: IEA Statistics © OECD/IEA 2014 (http://www.iea.org/stats/index.asp), subject to https://www.iea.org/t&c/termsandconditions/

See also:

Year Value
1971 35.47
1972 37.05
1973 35.27
1974 32.92
1975 33.18
1976 33.19
1977 34.80
1978 32.67
1979 33.20
1980 32.09
1981 31.24
1982 30.48
1983 31.13
1984 29.30
1985 29.40
1986 35.87
1987 33.91
1988 39.53
1989 39.22
1990 34.51
1991 36.47
1992 35.39
1993 31.74
1994 28.26
1995 29.15
1996 30.25
1997 28.65
1998 29.14
1999 31.87
2000 32.30
2001 30.27
2002 30.10
2003 30.83
2004 31.94
2005 31.79
2006 31.70
2007 33.82
2008 34.45
2009 36.19
2010 35.89
2011 36.89
2012 38.50
2013 37.40
2014 38.04

CO2 emissions from manufacturing industries and construction (% of total fuel combustion)

CO2 emissions from manufacturing industries and construction (% of total fuel combustion) in Argentina was 16.87 as of 2014. Its highest value over the past 43 years was 22.06 in 2004, while its lowest value was 13.28 in 1988.

Definition: CO2 emissions from manufacturing industries and construction contains the emissions from combustion of fuels in industry. The IPCC Source/Sink Category 1 A 2 includes these emissions. However, in the 1996 IPCC Guidelines, the IPCC category also includes emissions from industry autoproducers that generate electricity and/or heat. The IEA data are not collected in a way that allows the energy consumption to be split by specific end-use and therefore, autoproducers are shown as a separate item (Unallocated Autoproducers). Manufacturing industries and construction also includes emissions from coke inputs into blast furnaces, which may be reported either in the transformation sector, the industry sector or the separate IPCC Source/Sink Category 2, Industrial Processes.

Source: IEA Statistics © OECD/IEA 2014 (http://www.iea.org/stats/index.asp), subject to https://www.iea.org/t&c/termsandconditions/

See also:

Year Value
1971 19.30
1972 17.11
1973 17.43
1974 18.91
1975 18.06
1976 18.87
1977 15.90
1978 17.30
1979 16.44
1980 15.78
1981 14.78
1982 15.35
1983 14.27
1984 16.42
1985 16.91
1986 13.44
1987 15.63
1988 13.28
1989 14.10
1990 14.72
1991 13.81
1992 13.62
1993 13.57
1994 18.47
1995 17.13
1996 17.90
1997 21.38
1998 21.16
1999 19.73
2000 19.44
2001 21.41
2002 21.56
2003 21.81
2004 22.06
2005 20.80
2006 21.29
2007 20.51
2008 18.87
2009 18.19
2010 18.13
2011 17.33
2012 16.10
2013 16.53
2014 16.87

CO2 emissions from other sectors, excluding residential buildings and commercial and public services (% of total fuel combustion)

CO2 emissions from other sectors, excluding residential buildings and commercial and public services (% of total fuel combustion) in Argentina was 6.47 as of 2014. Its highest value over the past 43 years was 7.44 in 1985, while its lowest value was 4.25 in 1989.

Definition: CO2 emissions from other sectors, less residential buildings and commercial and public services, contains the emissions from commercial/institutional activities, residential, agriculture/forestry, fishing and other emissions not specified elsewhere that are included in the IPCC Source/Sink Categories 1 A 4 and 1 A 5. In the 1996 IPCC Guidelines, the category also includes emissions from autoproducers in the commercial/residential/agricultural sectors that generate electricity and/or heat. The IEA data are not collected in a way that allows the energy consumption to be split by specific end-use and therefore, autoproducers are shown as a separate item (Unallocated Autoproducers).

Source: IEA Statistics © OECD/IEA 2014 (http://www.iea.org/stats/index.asp), subject to https://www.iea.org/t&c/termsandconditions/

See also:

Year Value
1971 4.47
1972 4.39
1973 4.44
1974 4.81
1975 5.11
1976 5.33
1977 4.99
1978 5.42
1979 5.63
1980 5.43
1981 5.59
1982 5.86
1983 5.62
1984 5.26
1985 7.44
1986 4.94
1987 5.19
1988 4.84
1989 4.25
1990 4.61
1991 4.88
1992 5.32
1993 5.79
1994 6.37
1995 6.62
1996 6.59
1997 6.16
1998 5.68
1999 5.60
2000 5.42
2001 5.53
2002 5.89
2003 6.43
2004 6.95
2005 7.21
2006 6.30
2007 5.41
2008 7.16
2009 7.15
2010 5.99
2011 4.81
2012 4.83
2013 5.54
2014 6.47

CO2 emissions from transport (% of total fuel combustion)

CO2 emissions from transport (% of total fuel combustion) in Argentina was 24.17 as of 2014. Its highest value over the past 43 years was 34.02 in 1982, while its lowest value was 24.02 in 2009.

Definition: CO2 emissions from transport contains emissions from the combustion of fuel for all transport activity, regardless of the sector, except for international marine bunkers and international aviation. This includes domestic aviation, domestic navigation, road, rail and pipeline transport, and corresponds to IPCC Source/Sink Category 1 A 3. In addition, the IEA data are not collected in a way that allows the autoproducer consumption to be split by specific end-use and therefore, autoproducers are shown as a separate item (Unallocated Autoproducers).

Source: IEA Statistics © OECD/IEA 2014 (http://www.iea.org/stats/index.asp), subject to https://www.iea.org/t&c/termsandconditions/

See also:

Year Value
1971 29.24
1972 30.87
1973 30.08
1974 30.44
1975 29.72
1976 28.29
1977 29.29
1978 30.25
1979 31.06
1980 32.81
1981 33.33
1982 34.02
1983 33.34
1984 32.23
1985 29.95
1986 29.74
1987 29.00
1988 25.96
1989 26.45
1990 28.62
1991 28.60
1992 30.14
1993 33.29
1994 32.32
1995 32.65
1996 31.61
1997 31.03
1998 31.38
1999 29.50
2000 28.89
2001 28.38
2002 28.01
2003 26.73
2004 25.86
2005 26.51
2006 26.33
2007 25.64
2008 25.54
2009 24.02
2010 24.98
2011 27.18
2012 26.28
2013 25.28
2014 24.17

Classification

Topic: Environment Indicators

Sub-Topic: Emissions