Life expectancy at birth, total (years) - Country Ranking - Africa

Definition: Life expectancy at birth indicates the number of years a newborn infant would live if prevailing patterns of mortality at the time of its birth were to stay the same throughout its life.

Source: Derived from male and female life expectancy at birth from sources such as: (1) United Nations Population Division. World Population Prospects, (2) Census reports and other statistical publications from national statistical offices, (3) Eurostat: Demograp

See also: Thematic map, Time series comparison

Find indicator:
Rank Country Value Year
1 Algeria 75.86 2015
2 Morocco 75.52 2015
3 Tunisia 75.50 2015
4 Mauritius 74.35 2015
5 Seychelles 73.23 2015
6 Cabo Verde 72.44 2015
7 Libya 71.83 2015
8 Egypt 71.30 2015
9 Senegal 66.66 2015
10 Kenya 66.65 2015
11 Rwanda 66.62 2015
12 São Tomé and Principe 66.42 2015
13 Botswana 65.75 2015
14 Gabon 65.68 2015
15 Madagascar 65.51 2015
16 Ethiopia 65.01 2015
17 Tanzania 64.90 2015
18 Eritrea 64.62 2015
19 Sudan 64.23 2015
20 Congo 64.09 2015
21 Namibia 63.64 2015
22 Comoros 63.46 2015
23 Mauritania 63.05 2015
24 Malawi 62.54 2015
25 Ghana 62.41 2015
26 Djibouti 62.25 2015
27 Liberia 61.98 2015
28 South Africa 61.93 2015
29 Zambia 61.34 2015
30 Angola 61.19 2015
31 The Gambia 60.96 2015
32 Benin 60.58 2015
33 Zimbabwe 60.28 2015
34 Togo 59.92 2015
35 Burkina Faso 59.84 2015
36 Niger 59.68 2015
37 Uganda 59.51 2015
38 Guinea 59.40 2015
39 Dem. Rep. Congo 59.17 2015
40 Mozambique 57.61 2015
41 Cameroon 57.56 2015
42 Equatorial Guinea 57.51 2015
43 Mali 57.46 2015
44 Burundi 57.07 2015
45 Guinea-Bissau 56.95 2015
46 Swaziland 56.91 2015
47 Somalia 55.87 2015
48 Lesotho 53.57 2015
49 Côte d'Ivoire 53.08 2015
50 Nigeria 52.98 2015
51 Chad 52.55 2015
52 Sierra Leone 51.41 2015
53 Central African Republic 51.38 2015

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Development Relevance: Mortality rates for different age groups (infants, children, and adults) and overall mortality indicators (life expectancy at birth or survival to a given age) are important indicators of health status in a country. Because data on the incidence and prevalence of diseases are frequently unavailable, mortality rates are often used to identify vulnerable populations. And they are among the indicators most frequently used to compare socioeconomic development across countries.

Limitations and Exceptions: Annual data series from United Nations Population Division's World Population Prospects are interpolated data from 5-year period data. Therefore they may not reflect real events as much as observed data.

Statistical Concept and Methodology: Life expectancy at birth used here is the average number of years a newborn is expected to live if mortality patterns at the time of its birth remain constant in the future. It reflects the overall mortality level of a population, and summarizes the mortality pattern that prevails across all age groups in a given year. It is calculated in a period life table which provides a snapshot of a population's mortality pattern at a given time. It therefore does not reflect the mortality pattern that a person actually experiences during his/her life, which can be calculated in a cohort life table. High mortality in young age groups significantly lowers the life expectancy at birth. But if a person survives his/her childhood of high mortality, he/she may live much longer. For example, in a population with a life expectancy at birth of 50, there may be few people dying at age 50. The life expectancy at birth may be low due to the high childhood mortality so that once a person survives his/her childhood, he/she may live much longer than 50 years.

Aggregation method: Weighted average

Periodicity: Annual