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Niger Demographics Profile 2018

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Population19,245,344 (July 2017 est.)
Age structure0-14 years: 49.01% (male 4,757,806/female 4,674,437)
15-24 years: 19.1% (male 1,815,689/female 1,860,230)
25-54 years: 25.97% (male 2,495,927/female 2,501,362)
55-64 years: 3.28% (male 328,082/female 304,030)
65 years and over: 2.64% (male 259,046/female 248,735) (2017 est.)
Dependency ratiostotal dependency ratio: 111.6
youth dependency ratio: 106.2
elderly dependency ratio: 5.4
potential support ratio: 18.6 (2015 est.)
Median agetotal: 15.4 years
male: 15.3 years
female: 15.5 years (2017 est.)
Population growth rate3.19% (2017 est.)
Birth rate44.2 births/1,000 population (2017 est.)
Death rate11.8 deaths/1,000 population (2017 est.)
Net migration rate-0.5 migrant(s)/1,000 population (2017 est.)
Urbanizationurban population: 19.3% of total population (2017)
rate of urbanization: 5.49% annual rate of change (2015-20 est.)
Major cities - populationNIAMEY (capital) 1.09 million (2015)
Sex ratioat birth: 1.03 male(s)/female
0-14 years: 1.02 male(s)/female
15-24 years: 0.98 male(s)/female
25-54 years: 1 male(s)/female
55-64 years: 1.08 male(s)/female
65 years and over: 1.04 male(s)/female
total population: 1.01 male(s)/female (2016 est.)
Mother's mean age at first birth18.1 years
note: median age at first birth among women 25-29 (2012 est.)
Infant mortality ratetotal: 81.1 deaths/1,000 live births
male: 85.5 deaths/1,000 live births
female: 76.6 deaths/1,000 live births (2017 est.)
Life expectancy at birthtotal population: 55.9 years
male: 54.7 years
female: 57.3 years (2017 est.)
Total fertility rate6.49 children born/woman (2017 est.)
Contraceptive prevalence rate16.9% (2016)
HIV/AIDS - adult prevalence rate0.4% (2016 est.)
HIV/AIDS - people living with HIV/AIDS48,000 (2016 est.)
HIV/AIDS - deaths3,400 (2016 est.)
Drinking water sourceimproved:
urban: 100% of population
rural: 48.6% of population
total: 58.2% of population
unimproved:
urban: 0% of population
rural: 51.4% of population
total: 41.8% of population (2015 est.)
Sanitation facility accessimproved:
urban: 37.9% of population
rural: 4.6% of population
total: 10.9% of population
unimproved:
urban: 62.1% of population
rural: 95.4% of population
total: 89.1% of population (2015 est.)
Major infectious diseasesdegree of risk: very high
food or waterborne diseases: bacterial and protozoal diarrhea, hepatitis A, and typhoid fever
vectorborne diseases: malaria and dengue fever
water contact disease: schistosomiasis
respiratory disease: meningococcal meningitis
animal contact disease: rabies (2016)
Nationalitynoun: Nigerien(s)
adjective: Nigerien
Ethnic groupsHausa 53.1%, Zarma/Songhai 21.2%, Tuareg 11%, Fulani (Peul) 6.5%, Kanuri 5.9%, Gurma 0.8%, Arab 0.4%, Tubu 0.4%, other/unavailable 0.9% (2006 est.)
ReligionsMuslim 80%, other (includes indigenous beliefs and Christian) 20%
Demographic profileNiger has the highest total fertility rate (TFR) of any country in the world, averaging close to 7 children per woman in 2016. A slight decline in fertility over the last few decades has stalled. This leveling off of the high fertility rate is in large part a product of the continued desire for large families. In Niger, the TFR is lower than the desired fertility rate, which makes it unlikely that contraceptive use will increase. The high TFR sustains rapid population growth and a large youth population – almost 70% of the populace is under the age of 25. Gender inequality, including a lack of educational opportunities for women and early marriage and childbirth, also contributes to high population growth.
Because of large family sizes, children are inheriting smaller and smaller parcels of land. The dependence of most Nigeriens on subsistence farming on increasingly small landholdings, coupled with declining rainfall and the resultant shrinkage of arable land, are all preventing food production from keeping up with population growth.
For more than half a century, Niger's lack of economic development has led to steady net outmigration. In the 1960s, Nigeriens mainly migrated to coastal West African countries to work on a seasonal basis. Some headed to Libya and Algeria in the 1970s to work in the booming oil industry until its decline in the 1980s. Since the 1990s, the principal destinations for Nigerien labor migrants have been West African countries, especially Burkina Faso and Cote d’Ivoire, while emigration to Europe and North America has remained modest. During the same period, Niger’s desert trade route town Agadez became a hub for West African and other sub-Saharan migrants crossing the Sahara to North Africa and sometimes onward to Europe.
More than 60,000 Malian refugees have fled to Niger since violence between Malian government troops and armed rebels began in early 2012. Ongoing attacks by the Boko Haram Islamist insurgency, dating to 2013 in northern Nigeria and February 2015 in southeastern Niger, have pushed tens of thousands of Nigerian refugees and Nigerien returnees across the border to Niger and to displace thousands of locals in Niger’s already impoverished Diffa region.
LanguagesFrench (official), Hausa, Djerma
Literacydefinition: age 15 and over can read and write
total population: 19.1%
male: 27.3%
female: 11% (2015 est.)
School life expectancy (primary to tertiary education)total: 5 years
male: 6 years
female: 5 years (2012)
Child labor - children ages 5-14total number: 1,557,913
percentage: 43% (2006 est.)
Education expenditures6.7% of GDP (2014)
Maternal mortality rate553 deaths/100,000 live births (2015 est.)
Children under the age of 5 years underweight37.9% (2012)
Health expenditures5.8% of GDP (2014)
Physicians density0.02 physicians/1,000 population (2008)
Obesity - adult prevalence rate5.5% (2016)

Source: CIA World Factbook
This page was last updated on January 20, 2018

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