Malta - Urban population

The value for Urban population in Malta was 417,411 as of 2016. As the graph below shows, over the past 56 years this indicator reached a maximum value of 417,411 in 2016 and a minimum value of 270,993 in 1974.

Definition: Urban population refers to people living in urban areas as defined by national statistical offices. It is calculated using World Bank population estimates and urban ratios from the United Nations World Urbanization Prospects. Aggregation of urban and rural population may not add up to total population because of different country coverages.

Source: World Bank staff estimates based on the United Nations Population Division's World Urbanization Prospects.

See also:

Year Value
1960 294,316
1961 292,949
1962 291,536
1963 290,127
1964 288,759
1965 286,362
1966 282,936
1967 279,467
1968 276,131
1969 272,927
1970 271,474
1971 271,546
1972 271,346
1973 271,149
1974 270,993
1975 273,015
1976 274,435
1977 275,536
1978 278,444
1979 281,309
1980 284,300
1981 286,427
1982 292,666
1983 296,847
1984 296,939
1985 302,228
1986 307,591
1987 310,133
1988 313,103
1989 316,579
1990 320,102
1991 329,269
1992 333,102
1993 336,862
1994 340,447
1995 343,247
1996 346,401
1997 350,223
1998 353,666
1999 356,901
2000 360,316
2001 364,105
2002 367,875
2003 371,319
2004 374,812
2005 378,170
2006 380,483
2007 382,695
2008 386,024
2009 389,733
2010 392,394
2011 394,759
2012 398,444
2013 402,794
2014 407,180
2015 412,038
2016 417,411

Development Relevance: Explosive growth of cities globally signifies the demographic transition from rural to urban, and is associated with shifts from an agriculture-based economy to mass industry, technology, and service. In principle, cities offer a more favorable setting for the resolution of social and environmental problems than rural areas. Cities generate jobs and income, and deliver education, health care and other services. Cities also present opportunities for social mobilization and women's empowerment.

Limitations and Exceptions: Aggregation of urban and rural population may not add up to total population because of different country coverage. There is no consistent and universally accepted standard for distinguishing urban from rural areas, in part because of the wide variety of situations across countries. Most countries use an urban classification related to the size or characteristics of settlements. Some define urban areas based on the presence of certain infrastructure and services. And other countries designate urban areas based on administrative arrangements. Because of national differences in the characteristics that distinguish urban from rural areas, the distinction between urban and rural population is not amenable to a single definition that would be applicable to all countries. Estimates of the world's urban population would change significantly if China, India, and a few other populous nations were to change their definition of urban centers. Because the estimates of city and metropolitan area are based on national definitions of what constitutes a city or metropolitan area, cross-country comparisons should be made with caution.

Statistical Concept and Methodology: Urban population refers to people living in urban areas as defined by national statistical offices. The indicator is calculated using World Bank population estimates and urban ratios from the United Nations World Urbanization Prospects. To estimate urban populations, UN ratios of urban to total population were applied to the World Bank's estimates of total population. Countries differ in the way they classify population as "urban" or "rural." The population of a city or metropolitan area depends on the boundaries chosen.

Aggregation method: Sum

Periodicity: Annual

Classification

Topic: Environment Indicators

Sub-Topic: Density & urbanization