Battle-related deaths (number of people) - Country Ranking

Definition: Battle-related deaths are deaths in battle-related conflicts between warring parties in the conflict dyad (two conflict units that are parties to a conflict). Typically, battle-related deaths occur in warfare involving the armed forces of the warring parties. This includes traditional battlefield fighting, guerrilla activities, and all kinds of bombardments of military units, cities, and villages, etc. The targets are usually the military itself and its installations or state institutions and state representatives, but there is often substantial collateral damage in the form of civilians being killed in crossfire, in indiscriminate bombings, etc. All deaths--military as well as civilian--incurred in such situations, are counted as battle-related deaths.

Source: Uppsala Conflict Data Program, http://www.pcr.uu.se/research/ucdp/.

See also: Thematic map, Time series comparison

Find indicator:
Rank Country Value Year
1 Afghanistan 25,682.00 2018
2 Syrian Arab Republic 11,631.00 2018
3 Sri Lanka 10,165.00 2009
4 Yemen 4,512.00 2018
5 Somalia 2,207.00 2018
6 Liberia 1,787.00 2003
7 Bosnia and Herzegovina 1,345.00 1995
8 Iraq 1,254.00 2018
9 Nigeria 1,173.00 2018
10 Panama 920.00 1989
11 Croatia 826.00 1995
12 India 818.00 2018
13 Dem. Rep. Congo 770.00 2018
14 Cameroon 753.00 2018
15 Egypt 704.00 2018
16 Georgia 621.00 2008
17 Moldova 585.00 1992
18 Mali 517.00 2018
19 Nepal 457.00 2006
20 Turkey 436.00 2018
21 Guinea 430.00 2001
22 Philippines 420.00 2018
23 Romania 249.00 1989
23 Lao PDR 249.00 1990
25 Sudan 246.00 2018
26 Ukraine 234.00 2018
27 United States 233.00 2001
28 Pakistan 209.00 2018
29 Morocco 207.00 1989
29 Haiti 207.00 2004
31 Kyrgyz Republic 174.00 2000
32 Paraguay 150.00 1989
32 Chad 150.00 2018
34 Colombia 142.00 2018
35 Kuwait 135.00 1991
36 Burundi 133.00 2015
37 Côte d'Ivoire 98.00 2011
38 Myanmar 96.00 2018
39 El Salvador 88.00 1991
40 Papua New Guinea 78.00 1996
41 Niger 74.00 2018
41 Lebanon 74.00 2017
43 Tunisia 72.00 2016
43 North Macedonia 72.00 2001
45 Kenya 69.00 2018
46 Lesotho 68.00 1998
47 Iran 60.00 2018
48 Israel 58.00 2018
49 Comoros 56.00 1997
50 Mozambique 52.00 2018
51 Congo 51.00 2016
52 Sierra Leone 50.00 2001
52 Ethiopia 50.00 2016
54 Central African Republic 47.00 2018
54 Bangladesh 47.00 2017
56 Libya 44.00 2018
56 Spain 44.00 1991
58 Burkina Faso 43.00 2018
59 Nicaragua 39.00 1990
59 Trinidad and Tobago 39.00 1990
61 Uzbekistan 37.00 2004
61 Mexico 37.00 1996
63 Azerbaijan 36.00 2017
63 Thailand 36.00 2018
65 Djibouti 35.00 2008
66 Jordan 34.00 2016
67 Algeria 33.00 2018
68 United Kingdom 29.00 1998
69 Tajikistan 28.00 2011
69 Peru 28.00 2010
69 Russia 28.00 2018
72 Guatemala 27.00 1995
73 Indonesia 25.00 2018
73 Angola 25.00 2017
73 Eritrea 25.00 2016
73 Senegal 25.00 2011
73 Ecuador 25.00 2008
78 Saudi Arabia 11.00 2018
79 Cambodia 10.00 2011
80 Rwanda 9.00 2018
81 Mauritania 8.00 2011
82 Albania 6.00 1999
83 Namibia 5.00 2002
83 China 5.00 2015
85 Bhutan 4.00 1997
85 France 4.00 2018
85 Armenia 4.00 2016
88 Belgium 3.00 2018
89 Netherlands 2.00 1990
89 Solomon Islands 2.00 1992
89 Venezuela 2.00 2007
92 Australia 1.00 2018
92 Germany 1.00 1990
92 Malaysia 1.00 2017
95 Argentina 0.00 1992
95 Uganda 0.00 2017
95 Malta 0.00 1995
95 Qatar 0.00 2004
95 Italy 0.00 1993
95 Guinea-Bissau 0.00 2000
95 Serbia 0.00 2001

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Development Relevance: According to the Geneva Declaration on Armed Violence and Development, more than 526,000 people die each year because of the violence associated with armed conflict and large- and small-scale criminality. Recovery and rebuilding can take years, and the challenges are numerous: infrastructure to be rebuilt, persistently high crime, widespread health problems, education systems in disrepair, and unexploded ordnance to be cleared. Most countries emerging from conflict lack the capacity to rebuild the economy. Thus, capacity building is one of the first tasks for restoring growth and is linked to building peace and creating the conditions that lead to sustained poverty reduction. UN Peacekeepers serve in some of the most difficult and dangerous situations around the globe. United Nations Peacekeeping force, comprised of civilian, police and military personnel, helps countries torn by conflict create the conditions for lasting peace. In addition to maintaining peace and security, peacekeepers are increasingly charged with assisting in political processes; reforming judicial systems; training law enforcement and police forces; disarming and reintegrating former combatants; supporting the return of internally displaced persons and refugees. The World Bank and other international development agencies can help, but countries with fragile situations have to build their own institutions tailored to their own needs. Peacekeeping operations in post-conflict situations have been effective in reducing the risks of reversion to conflict.

Limitations and Exceptions: An armed conflict is a contested incompatibility that concerns a government or territory where the use of armed force between two parties (one of them the government) results in at least 25 battle related deaths in a calendar year. Data is from the Uppsala Conflict Data Program (UCDP) Battle-Related Deaths Dataset which focuses on the incompatibility and lists the country, as well as the battle location and territory where battle-related deaths are reported. When more than one country is listed in the dataset, the assignment of battle-related deaths is determined by the battle location. User can refer to the ICDP dataset where they have split the deaths for the actual location of the fighting when the fighting occurred on the disputed border.

Statistical Concept and Methodology: During warfare, targets are usually the military and its installations or state institutions and state representatives, but there is often substantial collateral damage of civilians killed in crossfire, indiscriminate bombings, and other military activities. All deaths - civilian as well as military - incurred in such situations are counted as battle-related deaths.

Aggregation method: Sum

Periodicity: Annual