People using at least basic sanitation services, urban (% of urban population) - Country Ranking

Definition: The percentage of people using at least basic sanitation services, that is, improved sanitation facilities that are not shared with other households. This indicator encompasses both people using basic sanitation services as well as those using safely managed sanitation services. Improved sanitation facilities include flush/pour flush to piped sewer systems, septic tanks or pit latrines; ventilated improved pit latrines, compositing toilets or pit latrines with slabs.

Source: WHO/UNICEF Joint Monitoring Programme (JMP) for Water Supply, Sanitation and Hygiene (washdata.org).

See also: Thematic map, Time series comparison

Find indicator:
Rank Country Value Year
1 Singapore 100.00 2017
1 Uzbekistan 100.00 2017
1 Andorra 100.00 2017
1 Israel 100.00 2017
1 Monaco 100.00 2017
1 Oman 100.00 2017
1 Palau 100.00 2017
1 North Macedonia 100.00 2017
1 New Zealand 100.00 2017
1 Chile 100.00 2017
11 United States 99.99 2017
12 Malta 99.95 2017
13 Austria 99.95 2017
14 Switzerland 99.90 2017
15 Spain 99.88 2017
16 Malaysia 99.86 2017
17 Turkey 99.82 2017
18 Armenia 99.74 2017
19 Montenegro 99.74 2017
20 Greenland 99.60 2017
20 Denmark 99.60 2017
22 Cyprus 99.53 2017
23 Serbia 99.52 2017
24 Portugal 99.51 2017
25 Belgium 99.49 2017
26 Finland 99.45 2017
27 Canada 99.41 2017
28 Germany 99.29 2017
29 Sweden 99.24 2017
30 Greece 99.21 2017
31 Thailand 99.19 2017
32 Slovenia 99.13 2017
33 Czech Republic 99.09 2017
34 Estonia 99.04 2017
35 United Kingdom 99.04 2017
36 Slovak Republic 98.90 2017
37 Bosnia and Herzegovina 98.87 2017
38 Italy 98.83 2017
39 Iceland 98.70 2017
40 France 98.59 2017
41 Poland 98.50 2017
42 Samoa 98.46 2017
43 Costa Rica 98.38 2017
44 Egypt 98.30 2017
45 Albania 98.29 2017
46 Belarus 98.22 2017
47 Norway 98.00 2017
48 Turkmenistan 97.97 2017
49 Croatia 97.85 2017
50 Hungary 97.76 2017
51 Netherlands 97.50 2017
52 Luxembourg 97.48 2017
53 Jordan 97.45 2017
54 Ukraine 97.39 2017
55 Lithuania 97.31 2017
56 Kazakhstan 97.03 2017
57 Iraq 96.69 2017
58 Tonga 96.60 2017
59 Uruguay 96.57 2017
60 Azerbaijan 96.44 2017
61 Hong Kong SAR, China 96.44 2017
62 Latvia 96.23 2017
63 Mauritius 95.97 2017
64 Argentina 95.86 2017
65 Cambodia 95.83 2017
66 Lao PDR 95.37 2017
67 Fiji 95.33 2017
68 Tunisia 95.29 2017
69 Romania 95.29 2017
70 Georgia 95.25 2017
71 Tajikistan 94.94 2017
72 Sri Lanka 94.82 2017
73 Russia 94.76 2017
74 Morocco 94.36 2017
75 Vietnam 94.26 2017
76 Paraguay 94.19 2017
77 Mexico 93.39 2017
78 Belize 93.06 2017
79 Colombia 92.89 2017
80 Brazil 92.76 2017
81 Panama 92.27 2017
82 Cuba 92.22 2017
83 Kyrgyz Republic 91.79 2017
84 Iran 91.74 2017
85 Guyana 91.51 2017
86 Syrian Arab Republic 91.44 2017
87 El Salvador 91.00 2017
88 Ecuador 90.86 2017
89 China 90.80 2017
90 Dem. People's Rep. Korea 89.92 2017
91 Algeria 89.67 2017
92 Ireland 89.45 2017
93 Botswana 89.42 2017
94 Suriname 89.41 2017
95 Yemen 87.86 2017
96 Bulgaria 86.78 2017
97 Dominican Republic 86.43 2017
98 Moldova 86.25 2017
99 Jamaica 85.53 2017
100 Honduras 85.27 2017
101 Nicaragua 83.67 2017
102 Cayman Islands 83.65 2016
103 Tuvalu 82.76 2017
104 Indonesia 80.25 2017
105 Cabo Verde 79.98 2017
106 Peru 79.57 2017
107 Guatemala 79.23 2017
108 Philippines 78.49 2017
109 Solomon Islands 77.91 2017
110 St. Lucia 77.80 2017
111 Pakistan 76.62 2017
112 Djibouti 76.32 2017
113 South Africa 76.31 2017
114 Myanmar 76.00 2017
115 Timor-Leste 75.93 2017
116 Mauritania 74.80 2017
117 Bhutan 72.59 2017
118 India 72.01 2017
119 Bolivia 71.75 2017
120 Equatorial Guinea 69.90 2017
121 Nepal 67.26 2017
122 Mongolia 66.33 2017
123 Nauru 65.60 2017
124 Senegal 64.99 2017
125 Angola 64.33 2017
126 Afghanistan 62.26 2017
127 Somalia 61.10 2017
128 Sudan 60.14 2017
129 Cameroon 55.95 2017
130 Mali 53.26 2017
131 Mozambique 52.29 2017
132 Rwanda 51.93 2017
133 Namibia 51.45 2017
134 Eswatini 50.90 2017
135 Bangladesh 50.69 2017
136 Central African Republic 49.10 2016
137 Gabon 48.65 2017
138 Vanuatu 48.29 2017
139 Nigeria 47.84 2017
140 Papua New Guinea 47.84 2017
141 São Tomé and Principe 47.62 2017
142 Zimbabwe 46.22 2017
143 Côte d'Ivoire 46.07 2017
144 The Gambia 45.49 2017
145 Comoros 45.24 2017
146 Niger 43.82 2017
147 Haiti 43.78 2017
148 Lesotho 42.72 2017
149 Tanzania 42.57 2017
150 Burundi 41.70 2017
151 Burkina Faso 39.38 2017
152 Guinea-Bissau 36.94 2017
153 Zambia 36.24 2017
154 Kenya 34.68 2017
155 Malawi 34.06 2017
156 Guinea 33.77 2017
157 Chad 30.12 2017
158 Togo 28.61 2017
159 Liberia 27.75 2017
160 Congo 27.20 2017
161 Benin 26.51 2017
162 Uganda 26.11 2017
163 Sierra Leone 25.65 2017
164 Ghana 23.74 2017
165 Dem. Rep. Congo 23.38 2017
166 Eritrea 21.99 2016
167 Ethiopia 19.60 2017
168 Madagascar 17.77 2017

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Development Relevance: Sanitation is fundamental to human development. Many international organizations use hygienic sanitation facilities as a measure for progress in the fight against poverty, disease, and death. Access to proper sanitation is also considered to be a human right, not a privilege, for every man, woman, and child. Sanitation generally refers to the provision of facilities and services for the safe disposal of human urine and feces. Inadequate sanitation is a major cause of disease world-wide and improving sanitation is known to have a significant beneficial impact on people's health. Basic and safely managed sanitation services can reduce diarrheal disease, and can significantly lessen the adverse health impacts of other disorders responsible for death and disease among millions of children. Diarrhea and worm infections weaken children and make them more susceptible to malnutrition and opportunistic infections like pneumonia, measles and malaria. The combined effects of inadequate sanitation, unsafe water supply and poor personal hygiene are responsible for many of childhood deaths. Every year, the failure to tackle these deficits results in severe welfare losses - wasted time, reduced productivity, ill health, impaired learning, environmental degradation and lost opportunities. Fundamental behavior changes are required before the use of improved facilities and services can be integrated into daily life. Many hygiene behaviors and habits are formed in childhood and, therefore, school health and hygiene education programs are an important part of water and sanitation improvements. Most basic sanitation technologies are not expensive to implement. However, those facing the problems of inadequate sanitation may not be aware of either the origin of their ills, or the true costs of poor sanitation and hygiene. As a result, in most of the developing countries those without sanitation are hard to convince of the need to invest scarce resources in sanitation facilities, or of the critical importance of changing long-held habits and unhygienic behaviors. Consequently, the people's representatives - governments and elected political leaders - rarely give sanitation or hygiene improvements the priority that is needed in order to tackle the massive sanitation deficit faced by the developing world. Children bear the brunt of sanitation-related impacts - their health, nutrition, growth, education, self-respect, and life opportunities suffer as a result of inadequate sanitation. Without improved sanitation, many of the current generation of children in developing countries are unlikely to develop to their full potential. Countries that don't take urgent action to redress sanitation deficiencies will find their future development and prosperity impaired.

Limitations and Exceptions: National, regional and income group estimates are made when data are available for at least 50 percent of the population.

Statistical Concept and Methodology: Data on drinking water, sanitation and hygiene are produced by the Joint Monitoring Programme of the World Health Organization (WHO) and United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF) based on administrative sources, national censuses and nationally representative household surveys. WHO/UNICEF defines basic sanitation facilities as improved sanitation facilities that are not shared with other households. Improved sanitation facilities include flush/pour flush to piped sewer systems, septic tanks or pit latrines; ventilated improved pit latrines, compositing toilets or pit latrines with slabs.

Aggregation method: Weighted average

Periodicity: Annual