Smoking prevalence, males (% of adults) - Country Ranking

Definition: Prevalence of smoking, male is the percentage of men ages 15 and over who smoke any form of tobacco, including cigarettes, cigars, pipes or any other smoked tobacco products. Data include daily and non-daily or occasional smoking.

Source: World Health Organization, Global Health Observatory Data Repository (http://apps.who.int/ghodata/).

See also: Thematic map, Time series comparison

Find indicator:
Rank Country Value Year
1 Indonesia 76.20 2015
2 Jordan 70.20 2015
3 Kiribati 63.90 2015
4 Sierra Leone 60.00 2015
5 Russia 59.00 2015
6 Georgia 57.70 2015
7 Lao PDR 56.60 2015
8 Lesotho 55.10 2015
9 Cuba 52.70 2015
10 Greece 52.60 2015
11 Armenia 52.30 2015
12 Albania 51.20 2015
13 Kyrgyz Republic 50.40 2015
14 Egypt 49.90 2015
15 Korea 49.80 2015
16 Ukraine 49.40 2015
17 Latvia 48.90 2015
18 Bahrain 48.80 2015
19 Mongolia 47.70 2015
20 China 47.60 2015
21 Tonga 47.30 2015
22 Bosnia and Herzegovina 47.20 2015
23 Vietnam 47.10 2015
24 Azerbaijan 46.50 2015
25 Belarus 46.20 2015
26 Moldova 45.70 2015
27 Lebanon 45.40 2015
27 Morocco 45.40 2015
29 Cambodia 44.10 2015
30 Mauritania 44.00 2015
31 Kazakhstan 43.90 2015
32 Cameroon 43.80 2015
33 Serbia 43.60 2015
34 Congo 43.20 2015
35 Malaysia 43.00 2015
35 Philippines 43.00 2015
35 Nauru 43.00 2015
35 Seychelles 43.00 2015
39 Bulgaria 42.40 2015
40 Pakistan 41.90 2015
41 Thailand 41.40 2015
42 Estonia 41.20 2015
42 Israel 41.20 2015
44 Samoa 41.00 2015
45 Mauritius 40.10 2015
46 Chile 40.00 2015
47 Bangladesh 39.80 2015
48 Slovak Republic 39.70 2015
49 Turkey 39.50 2015
50 Croatia 39.40 2015
51 Namibia 38.90 2015
52 Fiji 38.70 2015
53 Lithuania 38.10 2015
54 Czech Republic 37.40 2015
55 Andorra 37.20 2015
56 Nepal 37.10 2015
57 Romania 36.90 2015
58 Mali 36.80 2015
59 Burkina Faso 36.00 2015
60 Austria 35.50 2015
61 Japan 33.70 2015
62 Honduras 33.30 2015
63 Germany 32.40 2015
63 Poland 32.40 2015
65 Hungary 32.00 2015
66 Myanmar 31.60 2015
67 Portugal 31.50 2015
68 Mozambique 31.40 2015
68 South Africa 31.40 2015
70 Spain 31.30 2015
71 Zimbabwe 31.20 2015
72 Bolivia 30.50 2015
73 Jamaica 29.90 2015
74 France 29.80 2015
75 Malta 29.70 2015
76 Argentina 29.50 2015
77 Brunei 29.30 2015
78 Sri Lanka 28.40 2015
79 Paraguay 28.30 2015
79 Italy 28.30 2015
81 Singapore 28.00 2015
82 Saudi Arabia 27.90 2015
83 Liberia 27.60 2015
84 Tanzania 27.50 2015
85 Switzerland 26.90 2015
86 Uruguay 26.70 2015
87 Zambia 26.50 2015
87 Belgium 26.50 2015
89 Netherlands 26.20 2015
90 Luxembourg 25.80 2015
91 Malawi 25.40 2015
92 Uzbekistan 24.90 2015
93 Kenya 24.60 2015
94 Senegal 23.40 2015
95 Finland 23.20 2015
96 Comoros 23.10 2015
97 Norway 22.40 2015
97 Ireland 22.40 2015
99 Slovenia 22.30 2015
100 Cabo Verde 22.20 2015
101 Haiti 22.10 2015
102 Iran 21.50 2015
103 Oman 21.00 2015
104 Mexico 20.80 2015
105 India 20.40 2015
105 Sweden 20.40 2015
107 United Kingdom 19.90 2015
108 United States 19.50 2015
109 Brazil 19.30 2015
110 Swaziland 19.00 2015
111 Dominican Republic 18.80 2015
112 Niger 18.60 2015
113 Costa Rica 18.50 2015
114 Benin 17.70 2015
114 Canada 17.70 2015
116 Denmark 17.60 2015
117 Nigeria 17.40 2015
118 Iceland 17.00 2015
119 Australia 16.70 2015
120 Uganda 16.40 2015
121 Colombia 16.00 2015
122 Ecuador 14.00 2015
123 Ghana 13.10 2015
123 Barbados 13.10 2015
125 Panama 10.60 2015
126 Ethiopia 8.90 2015

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Statistical Concept and Methodology: The limited availability of data on health status is a major constraint in assessing the health situation in developing countries. Surveillance data are lacking for many major public health concerns. Estimates of prevalence and incidence are available for some diseases but are often unreliable and incomplete. National health authorities differ widely in capacity and willingness to collect or report information. To compensate for this and improve reliability and international comparability, the World Health Organization (WHO) prepares estimates in accordance with epidemiological models and statistical standards. Smoking is the most common form of tobacco use and the prevalence of smoking is therefore a good measure of the tobacco epidemic. (Corrao MA, Guindon GE, Sharma N, Shokoohi DF (eds). Tobacco Control Country Profiles, 2000, American Cancer Society, Atlanta.) Tobacco use causes heart and other vascular diseases and cancers of the lung and other organs. Given the long delay between starting to smoke and the onset of disease, the health impact of smoking will increase rapidly only in the next few decades. The data presented are age-standardized rates for adults ages 15 and older from the WHO.

Aggregation method: Weighted average

Periodicity: Annual