Machinery and transport equipment (% of value added in manufacturing) - Country Ranking

Definition: Value added in manufacturing is the sum of gross output less the value of intermediate inputs used in production for industries classified in ISIC major division D. Machinery and transport equipment correspond to ISIC divisions 29, 30, 32, 34, and 35.

Source: United Nations Industrial Development Organization, International Yearbook of Industrial Statistics.

See also: Thematic map, Time series comparison

Find indicator:
Rank Country Value Year
1 Singapore 55.55 2014
2 Korea 48.33 2014
3 Philippines 48.19 2012
4 Hungary 42.81 2013
5 Germany 42.14 2014
6 Israel 41.08 2014
7 Slovak Republic 40.96 2013
8 Japan 38.15 2012
9 Norway 37.89 2014
10 Sweden 37.33 2014
11 Czech Republic 34.75 2013
12 United Kingdom 34.73 2013
13 Switzerland 33.57 2013
14 Romania 32.22 2013
15 France 31.71 2014
16 Thailand 30.51 2011
17 Austria 29.66 2014
18 Malaysia 29.37 2012
19 Finland 29.36 2014
20 Italy 29.11 2014
21 Netherlands 28.76 2014
22 United States 28.32 2011
23 Denmark 27.89 2014
24 Ukraine 26.01 2014
25 Hong Kong SAR, China 25.34 2014
26 China 24.49 2007
27 Mexico 24.46 2013
28 Poland 24.03 2013
29 Spain 23.38 2014
30 Belarus 22.43 2014
31 Brazil 22.01 2013
32 Slovenia 21.89 2013
33 Vietnam 21.69 2013
34 Australia 21.24 2013
35 Belgium 20.02 2014
36 India 19.65 2014
37 Canada 19.54 2014
38 Algeria 19.26 2010
39 Malta 19.06 2010
40 Estonia 18.69 2014
41 Turkey 18.00 2014
42 Bulgaria 17.77 2014
43 Luxembourg 16.79 2013
44 Indonesia 16.71 2013
45 Portugal 15.97 2014
46 Botswana 15.13 1997
47 Latvia 14.82 2013
48 South Africa 14.36 2010
49 Croatia 13.76 1996
50 Serbia 13.20 2014
51 Lithuania 12.91 2014
52 New Zealand 11.59 2012
53 Ireland 10.80 2012
54 Russia 10.70 2014
55 Macedonia 10.39 2010
56 Bosnia and Herzegovina 9.65 2011
57 Iran 9.39 2014
58 Greece 9.25 2013
59 Kazakhstan 9.00 2013
60 Venezuela 8.95 1997
61 Iceland 8.78 2005
62 Papua New Guinea 8.76 1987
63 Tunisia 8.48 2007
64 Pakistan 8.48 2006
65 Azerbaijan 8.37 2013
66 Argentina 8.35 2002
67 Lao PDR 8.04 1999
68 Congo 7.85 2009
69 Cyprus 7.82 2014
70 Barbados 7.76 1997
71 Nigeria 7.18 1996
72 Cuba 6.98 1989
73 Paraguay 6.64 2010
74 Georgia 6.48 2013
75 Chile 6.07 2013
76 Morocco 5.90 2013
77 Kenya 5.54 2013
78 Saudi Arabia 5.53 2006
79 Ethiopia 5.45 2014
80 Jamaica 5.28 1968
81 Colombia 5.28 2012
82 Zambia 5.27 1994
83 Uruguay 4.46 2011
84 Mozambique 4.32 1973
85 Belize 4.20 1992
86 Sudan 4.16 2001
87 Egypt 3.81 2012
88 Bahrain 3.62 2013
89 Moldova 3.59 2012
90 Jordan 3.54 2013
91 Oman 3.41 2014
92 United Arab Emirates 3.35 1985
93 Peru 2.97 2011
94 Panama 2.75 2001
95 Ecuador 2.59 2008
96 Mauritius 2.56 2012
97 Macao SAR, China 2.56 1999
98 Lebanon 2.49 2007
99 Kyrgyz Republic 2.48 2012
100 Syrian Arab Republic 2.31 1979
101 Bangladesh 2.27 2011
102 Senegal 2.22 2012
103 Costa Rica 2.20 2013
104 Somalia 2.17 1986
105 Sri Lanka 2.12 2012
106 Iraq 2.06 2011
107 Central African Republic 1.91 1990
108 El Salvador 1.90 1998
109 Côte d'Ivoire 1.84 1997
110 Albania 1.80 2013
111 Kuwait 1.43 2013
112 Eritrea 1.35 2012
113 Mongolia 1.33 2011
114 Malawi 1.19 2012
115 Burkina Faso 1.19 1983
116 Guatemala 1.13 1988
117 Fiji 0.94 2011
118 Tonga 0.93 1981
119 Honduras 0.91 1996
120 The Gambia 0.79 1995
121 Nepal 0.78 2011
122 Uganda 0.76 1989
123 Bolivia 0.73 2010
124 Swaziland 0.67 2011
125 Nicaragua 0.59 1985
126 Ghana 0.59 2003
127 Namibia 0.53 1994
128 Madagascar 0.52 2006
129 Dominican Republic 0.45 1984
130 Tanzania 0.39 2010
131 Qatar 0.39 2013
132 Trinidad and Tobago 0.27 2006
133 Cameroon 0.21 2002
134 Yemen 0.15 2012
135 Cambodia 0.13 2000
136 Puerto Rico 0.03 2006
137 The Bahamas 0.01 1997
138 Burundi 0.00 1991
138 Benin 0.00 1981
138 Gabon 0.00 1995
138 Libya 0.00 1980
138 St. Lucia 0.00 1997

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Development Relevance: Firms typically use multiple processes to produce a product. For example, an automobile manufacturer engages in forging, welding, and painting as well as advertising, accounting, and other service activities. Collecting data at such a detailed level is not practical, nor is it useful to record production data at the highest level of a large, multiplant, multiproduct firm. The ISIC has therefore adopted as the definition of an establishment "an enterprise or part of an enterprise which independently engages in one, or predominantly one, kind of economic activity at or from one location . . . for which data are available . . ." (United Nations 1990). By design, this definition matches the reporting unit required for the production accounts of the United Nations System of National Accounts. The ISIC system is described in the United Nations' International Standard Industrial Classification of All Economic Activities, Third Revision (1990). The discussion of the ISIC draws on Ryten (1998).

Limitations and Exceptions: In establishing classifications systems compilers must define both the types of activities to be described and the units whose activities are to be reported. There are many possibilities, and the choices affect how the statistics can be interpreted and how useful they are in analyzing economic behavior. The ISIC emphasizes commonalities in the production process and is explicitly not intended to measure outputs (for which there is a newly developed Central Product Classification). Nevertheless, the ISIC views an activity as defined by "a process resulting in a homogeneous set of products."

Statistical Concept and Methodology: The data on the distribution of manufacturing value added by industry are provided by the United Nations Industrial Development Organization (UNIDO). UNIDO obtains the data from a variety of national and international sources, including the United Nations Statistics Division, the World Bank, the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development, and the International Monetary Fund. To improve comparability over time and across countries, UNIDO supplements these data with information from industrial censuses, statistics from national and international organizations, unpublished data that it collects in the field, and estimates by the UNIDO Secretariat. Nevertheless, coverage may be incomplete, particularly for the informal sector. When direct information on inputs and outputs is not available, estimates may be used, which may result in errors in industry totals. Moreover, countries use different reference periods (calendar or fiscal year) and valuation methods (basic or producer prices) to estimate value added.

Periodicity: Annual