Renewable internal freshwater resources per capita (cubic meters) - Country Ranking

Definition: Renewable internal freshwater resources flows refer to internal renewable resources (internal river flows and groundwater from rainfall) in the country. Renewable internal freshwater resources per capita are calculated using the World Bank's population estimates.

Source: Food and Agriculture Organization, AQUASTAT data.

See also: Thematic map, Time series comparison

Find indicator:
Rank Country Value Year
1 Greenland 10,662,190.00 2007
2 Iceland 519,264.70 2014
3 Guyana 315,701.20 2014
4 Suriname 178,935.20 2014
5 Bhutan 108,475.60 2014
6 Papua New Guinea 100,796.20 2014
7 Gabon 87,058.07 2014
8 Canada 80,423.43 2014
9 Solomon Islands 76,139.66 2014
10 Norway 74,359.11 2014
11 New Zealand 72,510.37 2014
12 Peru 54,535.74 2014
13 Chile 49,834.00 2014
14 Congo 46,865.36 2014
15 Liberia 45,876.77 2014
16 Colombia 45,668.21 2014
17 Belize 43,184.69 2014
18 Vanuatu 37,894.86 2014
19 Panama 35,013.84 2014
20 Fiji 32,950.43 2014
21 Central African Republic 31,584.78 2014
22 Russia 29,981.99 2014
23 Lao PDR 28,675.75 2014
24 Bolivia 28,347.22 2014
25 Brazil 27,919.19 2014
26 Ecuador 27,733.48 2014
27 Uruguay 27,114.19 2014
28 Venezuela 26,793.02 2014
29 Nicaragua 25,428.42 2014
30 Costa Rica 23,564.27 2014
31 Equatorial Guinea 23,167.21 2014
32 Sierra Leone 22,801.30 2014
33 Australia 20,957.85 2014
34 Brunei 20,743.39 2014
35 Guinea 20,267.28 2014
36 Finland 19,591.64 2014
37 Malaysia 19,419.71 2014
38 Myanmar 19,184.86 2014
39 Paraguay 17,728.55 2014
40 Sweden 17,635.94 2014
41 Georgia 15,628.81 2014
42 Madagascar 14,285.78 2014
43 Dem. Rep. Congo 12,200.50 2014
44 Cameroon 12,036.05 2014
45 Mongolia 11,836.30 2014
46 São Tomé and Principe 11,137.96 2014
47 Ireland 10,520.12 2014
48 Bosnia and Herzegovina 10,194.99 2014
49 Honduras 10,123.29 2014
50 Estonia 9,668.75 2014
51 Guinea-Bissau 9,453.81 2014
52 Albania 9,310.85 2014
53 Slovenia 9,054.40 2014
54 Croatia 8,894.89 2014
55 United States 8,850.88 2014
56 Latvia 8,496.42 2014
57 Kyrgyz Republic 8,384.89 2014
58 Indonesia 7,913.64 2014
59 Cambodia 7,895.51 2014
60 Tajikistan 7,689.48 2014
61 Nepal 7,366.13 2014
62 Timor-Leste 6,995.47 2014
63 Guatemala 6,857.90 2014
64 Argentina 6,843.30 2014
65 Austria 6,435.49 2014
66 Angola 5,493.33 2014
67 Greece 5,324.81 2014
68 Lithuania 5,272.19 2014
69 Zambia 5,207.88 2014
70 Switzerland 4,933.66 2014
71 Philippines 4,765.55 2014
72 Andorra 3,984.20 2014
73 Vietnam 3,918.68 2014
74 Mozambique 3,815.70 2014
75 Jamaica 3,763.30 2014
76 Kazakhstan 3,722.17 2014
77 Portugal 3,653.47 2014
78 Belarus 3,588.58 2014
79 Mali 3,543.12 2014
80 Mexico 3,398.28 2014
81 Côte d'Ivoire 3,392.84 2014
82 Japan 3,378.49 2014
83 Cuba 3,371.39 2014
84 Thailand 3,280.31 2014
85 France 3,015.86 2014
86 Italy 3,002.18 2014
87 Turkey 2,939.20 2014
88 Bulgaria 2,907.00 2014
89 Trinidad and Tobago 2,818.68 2014
90 Dominica 2,813.53 2014
91 Namibia 2,709.56 2014
92 Dem. People's Rep. Korea 2,673.82 2014
93 North Macedonia 2,598.93 2014
94 Lesotho 2,559.41 2014
95 Sri Lanka 2,541.15 2014
96 El Salvador 2,482.87 2014
97 Eswatini 2,410.91 2014
98 Spain 2,392.38 2014
99 Armenia 2,355.10 2014
100 Slovak Republic 2,325.30 2014
101 Dominican Republic 2,311.81 2014
102 United Kingdom 2,244.13 2014
103 Mauritius 2,181.72 2014
104 Romania 2,128.69 2014
105 China 2,061.91 2014
106 Puerto Rico 2,008.56 2014
107 The Bahamas 1,888.66 2014
108 Grenada 1,836.51 2014
109 Senegal 1,820.14 2014
110 Luxembourg 1,797.53 2014
111 St. Lucia 1,682.60 2014
112 Tanzania 1,681.35 2014
113 Iran 1,658.80 2014
114 Togo 1,611.10 2014
115 Comoros 1,580.22 2014
116 The Gambia 1,482.18 2014
117 Afghanistan 1,412.91 2014
118 Poland 1,410.09 2014
119 Germany 1,321.27 2014
120 Korea 1,277.92 2014
121 Nigeria 1,252.80 2014
122 Czech Republic 1,249.37 2014
123 Ethiopia 1,243.70 2014
124 Haiti 1,233.29 2014
125 Ukraine 1,217.09 2014
126 Serbia 1,179.01 2014
127 Botswana 1,149.09 2014
128 India 1,116.08 2014
129 Ghana 1,112.97 2014
130 Chad 1,097.81 2014
131 Belgium 1,070.56 2014
132 Denmark 1,063.18 2014
133 Uganda 1,056.56 2014
134 Iraq 1,022.90 2014
135 Burundi 1,021.91 2014
136 Benin 1,001.28 2014
137 Malawi 990.82 2014
138 Eritrea 934.41 2007
139 St. Vincent and the Grenadines 918.60 2014
140 Zimbabwe 902.35 2014
141 Rwanda 857.12 2014
142 Azerbaijan 851.07 2014
143 Morocco 848.14 2014
144 South Africa 821.33 2014
145 Lebanon 766.48 2014
146 Burkina Faso 710.79 2014
147 Bangladesh 679.52 2014
148 Cyprus 676.92 2014
149 Netherlands 652.24 2014
150 Hungary 608.12 2014
151 Cabo Verde 578.85 2014
152 Antigua and Barbuda 561.79 2014
153 Uzbekistan 531.25 2014
154 St. Kitts and Nevis 472.68 2014
155 Moldova 455.52 2014
156 Somalia 446.97 2014
157 Kenya 443.26 2014
158 Syrian Arab Republic 381.07 2014
159 Tunisia 379.19 2014
160 Oman 347.63 2014
161 Djibouti 333.82 2014
162 Algeria 289.03 2014
163 Pakistan 281.61 2014
164 Barbados 280.87 2014
165 Turkmenistan 257.03 2014
166 Niger 181.91 2014
167 Malta 116.21 2014
168 Libya 110.03 2014
169 Singapore 109.69 2014
170 Mauritania 101.76 2014
171 Israel 91.29 2014
172 Yemen 81.32 2014
173 Saudi Arabia 77.63 2014
174 Jordan 76.46 2014
175 Qatar 22.77 2014
176 Egypt 19.91 2014
177 United Arab Emirates 16.28 2014
178 Bahrain 2.99 2014
179 Kuwait 0.00 2014
179 Sudan 0.00 2018

More rankings: Africa | Asia | Central America & the Caribbean | Europe | Middle East | North America | Oceania | South America | World |

Development Relevance: UNESCO estimates that in developing countries in Asia, Africa and Latin America, public water withdrawal represents just 50-100 liters (13 to 26 gallons) per person per day. In regions with insufficient water resources, this figure may be as low as 20-60 (5 to 15 gallons) liters per day. People in developed countries on average consume about 10 times more water daily than those in developing countries. While some countries have an abundant supply of fresh water, others do not have as much. UN estimates that many areas of the world are already experiencing stress on water availability. Due to the accelerated pace of population growth and an increase in the amount of water a single person uses, it is expected that this situation will continue to get worse. The ability of developing countries to make more water available for domestic, agricultural, industrial and environmental uses will depend on better management of water resources and more cross-sectorial planning and integration. According to World Water Council, by 2020, water use is expected to increase by 40 percent, and 17 percent more water will be required for food production to meet the needs of the growing population. The three major factors causing increasing water demand over the past century are population growth, industrial development and the expansion of irrigated agriculture. Water productivity is an indication only of the efficiency by which each country uses its water resources. Given the different economic structure of each country, these indicators should be used carefully, taking into account a country's sectorial activities and natural resource endowments. According to Commission on Sustainable Development (CSD) agriculture accounts for more than 70 percent of freshwater drawn from lakes, rivers and underground sources. Most is used for irrigation which provides about 40 percent of the world food production. Poor management has resulted in the salinization of about 20 percent of the world's irrigated land, with an additional 1.5 million ha affected annually. There is now ample evidence that increased hydrologic variability and change in climate has and will continue to have a profound impact on the water sector through the hydrologic cycle, water availability, water demand, and water allocation at the global, regional, basin, and local levels. Properly managed water resources are a critical component of growth, poverty reduction and equity. The livelihoods of the poorest are critically associated with access to water services. A shortage of water in the future would be detrimental to the human population as it would affect everything from sanitation, to overall health and the production of grain. Freshwater use by continents is partly based on several socio-economic development factors, including population, physiography, and climatic characteristics. It is estimated that in the coming decades the most intensive growth of water withdrawal is expected to occur in Africa and South America (increasing by 1.5-1.6 times), while the smallest growth will take place in Europe and North America (1.2 times). The Commission for Sustainable Development (CSD) has reported that many countries lack adequate legislation and policies for efficient and equitable allocation and use of water resources. Progress is, however, being made with the review of national legislation and enactment of new laws and regulations.

Limitations and Exceptions: A common perception is that most of the available freshwater resources are visible (on the surfaces of lakes, reservoirs and rivers). However, this visible water represents only a tiny fraction of global freshwater resources, as most of it is stored in aquifers, with the largest stocks stored in solid form in the Antarctic and in Greenland's ice cap. The data on freshwater resources are based on estimates of runoff into rivers and recharge of groundwater. These estimates are based on different sources and refer to different years, so cross-country comparisons should be made with caution. Because the data are collected intermittently, they may hide significant variations in total renewable water resources from year to year. The data also fail to distinguish between seasonal and geographic variations in water availability within countries. Data for small countries and countries in arid and semiarid zones are less reliable than those for larger countries and countries with greater rainfall. Caution should also be used in comparing data on annual freshwater withdrawals, which are subject to variations in collection and estimation methods. In addition, inflows and outflows are estimated at different times and at different levels of quality and precision, requiring caution in interpreting the data, particularly for water-short countries, notably in the Middle East and North Africa. The data are based on surveys and estimates provided by governments to the Joint Monitoring Programme of the World Health Organization (WHO) and the United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF). The coverage rates are based on information from service users on actual household use rather than on information from service providers, which may include nonfunctioning systems.

Statistical Concept and Methodology: Renewable water resources (internal and external) include average annual flow of rivers and recharge of aquifers generated from endogenous precipitation, and those water resources that are not generated in the country, such as inflows from upstream countries (groundwater and surface water), and part of the water of border lakes and/or rivers. Non-renewable water includes groundwater bodies (deep aquifers) that have a negligible rate of recharge on the human time-scale. While renewable water resources are expressed in flows, non-renewable water resources have to be expressed in quantity (stock). Runoff from glaciers where the mass balance is negative is considered non-renewable. Renewable internal freshwater resources per capita are calculated using the World Bank's population estimates. The unit of calculation is m3/year per inhabitant. Internal renewable freshwater resources per capita are calculated using the World Bank's population estimates. Total actual renewable water resources correspond to the maximum theoretical yearly amount of water actually available for a country at a given moment. The unit of calculation is km3/year or 109 m3/year. Calculation Criteria is [Water resources: total renewable (actual)] = [Surface water: total renewable (actual)] + [Groundwater: total renewable (actual)] - [Overlap between surface water and groundwater].* Fresh water is naturally occurring water on the Earth's surface. It is a renewable but limited natural resource. Fresh water can only be renewed through the process of the water cycle, where water from seas, lakes, forests, land, rivers, and dams evaporates, forms clouds, and returns as precipitation. However, if more fresh water is consumed through human activities than is restored by nature, the result is that the quantity of fresh water available in lakes, rivers, dams and underground waters can be reduced which can cause serious damage to the surrounding environment. * http://www.fao.org/nr/water/aquastat/data/glossary/search.html?termId=4188&submitBtn=s&cls=yes

Aggregation method: Weighted average

Periodicity: Annual