Guinea-Bissau - Urban population

The value for Urban population in Guinea-Bissau was 909,556 as of 2016. As the graph below shows, over the past 56 years this indicator reached a maximum value of 909,556 in 2016 and a minimum value of 83,832 in 1960.

Definition: Urban population refers to people living in urban areas as defined by national statistical offices. It is calculated using World Bank population estimates and urban ratios from the United Nations World Urbanization Prospects. Aggregation of urban and rural population may not add up to total population because of different country coverages.

Source: World Bank staff estimates based on the United Nations Population Division's World Urbanization Prospects.

See also:

Year Value
1960 83,832
1961 85,701
1962 87,534
1963 89,409
1964 91,423
1965 93,636
1966 96,077
1967 98,716
1968 101,553
1969 104,555
1970 107,714
1971 111,066
1972 114,597
1973 118,116
1974 121,363
1975 124,166
1976 126,390
1977 128,139
1978 129,763
1979 132,682
1980 140,990
1981 150,676
1982 161,787
1983 174,196
1984 187,625
1985 201,769
1986 216,601
1987 232,205
1988 248,679
1989 266,139
1990 284,764
1991 304,623
1992 322,400
1993 338,447
1994 354,741
1995 371,077
1996 387,358
1997 403,644
1998 420,198
1999 437,435
2000 455,693
2001 475,089
2002 495,652
2003 517,409
2004 540,314
2005 564,307
2006 589,493
2007 615,920
2008 643,692
2009 672,867
2010 703,584
2011 735,524
2012 768,680
2013 802,863
2014 837,849
2015 873,436
2016 909,556

Development Relevance: Explosive growth of cities globally signifies the demographic transition from rural to urban, and is associated with shifts from an agriculture-based economy to mass industry, technology, and service. In principle, cities offer a more favorable setting for the resolution of social and environmental problems than rural areas. Cities generate jobs and income, and deliver education, health care and other services. Cities also present opportunities for social mobilization and women's empowerment.

Limitations and Exceptions: Aggregation of urban and rural population may not add up to total population because of different country coverage. There is no consistent and universally accepted standard for distinguishing urban from rural areas, in part because of the wide variety of situations across countries. Most countries use an urban classification related to the size or characteristics of settlements. Some define urban areas based on the presence of certain infrastructure and services. And other countries designate urban areas based on administrative arrangements. Because of national differences in the characteristics that distinguish urban from rural areas, the distinction between urban and rural population is not amenable to a single definition that would be applicable to all countries. Estimates of the world's urban population would change significantly if China, India, and a few other populous nations were to change their definition of urban centers. Because the estimates of city and metropolitan area are based on national definitions of what constitutes a city or metropolitan area, cross-country comparisons should be made with caution.

Statistical Concept and Methodology: Urban population refers to people living in urban areas as defined by national statistical offices. The indicator is calculated using World Bank population estimates and urban ratios from the United Nations World Urbanization Prospects. To estimate urban populations, UN ratios of urban to total population were applied to the World Bank's estimates of total population. Countries differ in the way they classify population as "urban" or "rural." The population of a city or metropolitan area depends on the boundaries chosen.

Aggregation method: Sum

Periodicity: Annual

Classification

Topic: Environment Indicators

Sub-Topic: Density & urbanization