Estonia - CO2 emissions

CO2 emissions from gaseous fuel consumption (kt)

The value for CO2 emissions from gaseous fuel consumption (kt) in Estonia was 1,202.78 as of 2009. As the graph below shows, over the past 17 years this indicator reached a maximum value of 1,851.84 in 2006 and a minimum value of 740.73 in 1993.

Definition: Carbon dioxide emissions from liquid fuel consumption refer mainly to emissions from use of natural gas as an energy source.

Source: Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center, Environmental Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Tennessee, United States.

See also:

Year Value
1992 1,507.14
1993 740.73
1994 1,052.43
1995 1,199.11
1996 1,470.47
1997 1,430.13
1998 1,356.79
1999 1,320.12
2000 1,514.47
2001 1,628.15
2002 1,364.12
2003 1,558.48
2004 1,774.83
2005 1,829.83
2006 1,851.84
2007 1,840.83
2008 1,763.83
2009 1,202.78

CO2 emissions from gaseous fuel consumption (% of total)

CO2 emissions from gaseous fuel consumption (% of total) in Estonia was 7.54 as of 2009. Its highest value over the past 17 years was 10.93 in 2006, while its lowest value was 3.98 in 1993.

Definition: Carbon dioxide emissions from liquid fuel consumption refer mainly to emissions from use of natural gas as an energy source.

Source: Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center, Environmental Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Tennessee, United States.

See also:

Year Value
1992 6.54
1993 3.98
1994 5.64
1995 7.16
1996 7.82
1997 7.68
1998 7.91
1999 8.53
2000 9.73
2001 10.19
2002 8.82
2003 8.88
2004 9.95
2005 10.48
2006 10.93
2007 9.23
2008 9.60
2009 7.54

CO2 emissions (kg per 2000 US$ of GDP)

The latest value for CO2 emissions (kg per 2000 US$ of GDP) in Estonia was 2.04 as of 2009. Over the past 14 years, the value for this indicator has fluctuated between 4.33 in 1996 and 1.92 in 2006.

Definition: Carbon dioxide emissions are those stemming from the burning of fossil fuels and the manufacture of cement. They include carbon dioxide produced during consumption of solid, liquid, and gas fuels and gas flaring.

Source: Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center, Environmental Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Tennessee, United States.

See also:

Year Value
1995 4.08
1996 4.33
1997 3.83
1998 3.30
1999 2.99
2000 2.74
2001 2.65
2002 2.41
2003 2.53
2004 2.42
2005 2.18
2006 1.92
2007 2.10
2008 2.02
2009 2.04

CO2 emissions (kt)

The value for CO2 emissions (kt) in Estonia was 15,951 as of 2009. As the graph below shows, over the past 17 years this indicator reached a maximum value of 23,036 in 1992 and a minimum value of 15,471 in 2002.

Definition: Carbon dioxide emissions are those stemming from the burning of fossil fuels and the manufacture of cement. They include carbon dioxide produced during consumption of solid, liquid, and gas fuels and gas flaring.

Source: Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center, Environmental Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Tennessee, United States.

See also:

Year Value
1992 23,036
1993 18,628
1994 18,661
1995 16,755
1996 18,808
1997 18,614
1998 17,143
1999 15,475
2000 15,559
2001 15,984
2002 15,471
2003 17,554
2004 17,840
2005 17,462
2006 16,945
2007 19,952
2008 18,383
2009 15,951

CO2 emissions from liquid fuel consumption (kt)

The value for CO2 emissions from liquid fuel consumption (kt) in Estonia was 2,538 as of 2009. As the graph below shows, over the past 17 years this indicator reached a maximum value of 4,859 in 1993 and a minimum value of 2,145 in 2000.

Definition: Carbon dioxide emissions from liquid fuel consumption refer mainly to emissions from use of petroleum-derived fuels as an energy source.

Source: Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center, Environmental Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Tennessee, United States.

See also:

Year Value
1992 4,026
1993 4,859
1994 4,686
1995 3,289
1996 3,542
1997 3,641
1998 3,465
1999 2,897
2000 2,145
2001 2,640
2002 2,585
2003 2,633
2004 2,637
2005 2,648
2006 2,666
2007 2,992
2008 2,655
2009 2,538

CO2 emissions from liquid fuel consumption (% of total)

CO2 emissions from liquid fuel consumption (% of total) in Estonia was 15.91 as of 2009. Its highest value over the past 17 years was 26.08 in 1993, while its lowest value was 13.79 in 2000.

Definition: Carbon dioxide emissions from liquid fuel consumption refer mainly to emissions from use of petroleum-derived fuels as an energy source.

Source: Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center, Environmental Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Tennessee, United States.

See also:

Year Value
1992 17.48
1993 26.08
1994 25.11
1995 19.63
1996 18.83
1997 19.56
1998 20.21
1999 18.72
2000 13.79
2001 16.52
2002 16.71
2003 15.00
2004 14.78
2005 15.16
2006 15.73
2007 15.00
2008 14.44
2009 15.91

CO2 emissions (metric tons per capita)

The value for CO2 emissions (metric tons per capita) in Estonia was 11.90 as of 2009. As the graph below shows, over the past 17 years this indicator reached a maximum value of 15.03 in 1992 and a minimum value of 11.25 in 1999.

Definition: Carbon dioxide emissions are those stemming from the burning of fossil fuels and the manufacture of cement. They include carbon dioxide produced during consumption of solid, liquid, and gas fuels and gas flaring.

Source: Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center, Environmental Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Tennessee, United States.

See also:

Year Value
1992 15.03
1993 12.47
1994 12.76
1995 11.66
1996 13.29
1997 13.30
1998 12.37
1999 11.25
2000 11.36
2001 11.72
2002 11.39
2003 12.97
2004 13.22
2005 12.97
2006 12.61
2007 14.87
2008 13.71
2009 11.90

CO2 emissions (kg per PPP $ of GDP)

The latest value for CO2 emissions (kg per PPP $ of GDP) in Estonia was 0.61 as of 2009. Over the past 14 years, the value for this indicator has fluctuated between 1.92 in 1996 and 0.61 in 2009.

Definition: Carbon dioxide emissions are those stemming from the burning of fossil fuels and the manufacture of cement. They include carbon dioxide produced during consumption of solid, liquid, and gas fuels and gas flaring.

Source: Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center, Environmental Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Tennessee, United States.

See also:

Year Value
1995 1.85
1996 1.92
1997 1.67
1998 1.46
1999 1.28
2000 1.15
2001 1.09
2002 0.95
2003 0.97
2004 0.90
2005 0.78
2006 0.66
2007 0.69
2008 0.62
2009 0.61

CO2 emissions (kg per 2005 PPP $ of GDP)

The latest value for CO2 emissions (kg per 2005 PPP $ of GDP) in Estonia was 0.73 as of 2009. Over the past 14 years, the value for this indicator has fluctuated between 1.56 in 1996 and 0.69 in 2006.

Definition: Carbon dioxide emissions are those stemming from the burning of fossil fuels and the manufacture of cement. They include carbon dioxide produced during consumption of solid, liquid, and gas fuels and gas flaring.

Source: Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center, Environmental Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Tennessee, United States.

See also:

Year Value
1995 1.47
1996 1.56
1997 1.38
1998 1.19
1999 1.08
2000 0.99
2001 0.95
2002 0.87
2003 0.91
2004 0.87
2005 0.78
2006 0.69
2007 0.76
2008 0.73
2009 0.73

CO2 emissions from solid fuel consumption (kt)

The value for CO2 emissions from solid fuel consumption (kt) in Estonia was 12,053 as of 2009. As the graph below shows, over the past 17 years this indicator reached a maximum value of 17,202 in 1992 and a minimum value of 11,082 in 1999.

Definition: Carbon dioxide emissions from solid fuel consumption refer mainly to emissions from use of coal as an energy source.

Source: Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center, Environmental Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Tennessee, United States.

See also:

Year Value
1992 17,202
1993 12,783
1994 12,717
1995 12,053
1996 13,601
1997 13,330
1998 12,160
1999 11,082
2000 11,731
2001 11,514
2002 11,291
2003 13,110
2004 13,121
2005 12,622
2006 12,009
2007 14,653
2008 13,561
2009 12,053

CO2 emissions from solid fuel consumption (% of total)

CO2 emissions from solid fuel consumption (% of total) in Estonia was 75.56 as of 2009. Its highest value over the past 17 years was 75.56 in 2009, while its lowest value was 68.15 in 1994.

Definition: Carbon dioxide emissions from solid fuel consumption refer mainly to emissions from use of coal as an energy source.

Source: Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center, Environmental Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Tennessee, United States.

See also:

Year Value
1992 74.67
1993 68.62
1994 68.15
1995 71.94
1996 72.31
1997 71.61
1998 70.93
1999 71.61
2000 75.39
2001 72.03
2002 72.98
2003 74.68
2004 73.55
2005 72.28
2006 70.87
2007 73.44
2008 73.77
2009 75.56

GHG net emissions/removals by LUCF (Mt of CO2 equivalent)

The value for GHG net emissions/removals by LUCF (Mt of CO2 equivalent) in Estonia was -7.03 as of 2009. As the graph below shows, over the past 19 years this indicator reached a maximum value of 4.24 in 2001 and a minimum value of -13.71 in 2007.

Definition: GHG net emissions/removals by LUCF refers to changes in atmospheric levels of all greenhouse gases attributable to forest and land-use change activities, including but not limited to (1) emissions and removals of CO2 from decreases or increases in biomass stocks due to forest management, logging, fuelwood collection, etc.; (2) conversion of existing forests and natural grasslands to other land uses; (3) removal of CO2 from the abandonment of formerly managed lands (e.g. croplands and pastures); and (4) emissions and removals of CO2 in soil associated with land-use change and management. For Annex-I countries under the UNFCCC, these data are drawn from the annual GHG inventories submitted to the UNFCCC by each country; for non-Annex-I countries, data are drawn from the most recently submitted National Communication where available. Because of differences in reporting years and methodologies, these data are not generally considered comparable across countries. Data are in million metric tons.

Source: United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change.

See also:

Year Value
1990 -10.42
1991 -8.48
1992 -9.18
1993 -9.30
1994 -9.38
1995 -9.46
1996 -9.15
1997 -9.47
1998 -8.81
1999 -4.52
2000 4.01
2001 4.24
2002 2.64
2003 1.06
2004 -5.71
2005 -8.67
2006 -1.58
2007 -13.71
2008 -0.33
2009 -7.03

CO2 emissions from residential buildings and commercial and public services (million metric tons)

The value for CO2 emissions from residential buildings and commercial and public services (million metric tons) in Estonia was 0.36 as of 2010. As the graph below shows, over the past 20 years this indicator reached a maximum value of 1.44 in 1990 and a minimum value of 0.35 in 2009.

Definition: CO2 emissions from residential buildings and commercial and public services contains all emissions from fuel combustion in households. This corresponds to IPCC Source/Sink Category 1 A 4 b. Commercial and public services includes emissions from all activities of ISIC Divisions 41, 50-52, 55, 63-67, 70-75, 80, 85, 90-93 and 99.

Source: IEA Statistics © OECD/IEA, http://www.iea.org/stats/index.asp), International Energy Agency electronic files on CO2 Emissions from Fuel Combustion.

See also:

Year Value
1990 1.44
1991 1.42
1992 0.68
1993 0.54
1994 0.56
1995 0.53
1996 0.64
1997 0.63
1998 0.55
1999 0.47
2000 0.49
2001 0.53
2002 0.45
2003 0.50
2004 0.50
2005 0.49
2006 0.44
2007 0.39
2008 0.39
2009 0.35
2010 0.36

CO2 emissions from residential buildings and commercial and public services (% of total fuel combustion)

CO2 emissions from residential buildings and commercial and public services (% of total fuel combustion) in Estonia was 1.95 as of 2010. Its highest value over the past 20 years was 4.42 in 1991, while its lowest value was 1.95 in 2010.

Definition: CO2 emissions from residential buildings and commercial and public services contains all emissions from fuel combustion in households. This corresponds to IPCC Source/Sink Category 1 A 4 b. Commercial and public services includes emissions from all activities of ISIC Divisions 41, 50-52, 55, 63-67, 70-75, 80, 85, 90-93 and 99.

Source: IEA Statistics © OECD/IEA, http://www.iea.org/stats/index.asp), International Energy Agency electronic files on CO2 Emissions from Fuel Combustion.

See also:

Year Value
1990 3.99
1991 4.42
1992 2.89
1993 3.00
1994 3.15
1995 3.29
1996 3.77
1997 3.81
1998 3.44
1999 3.16
2000 3.35
2001 3.51
2002 3.08
2003 3.02
2004 2.99
2005 2.90
2006 2.84
2007 2.02
2008 2.20
2009 2.39
2010 1.95

CO2 emissions from electricity and heat production, total (million metric tons)

The value for CO2 emissions from electricity and heat production, total (million metric tons) in Estonia was 14.85 as of 2010. As the graph below shows, over the past 20 years this indicator reached a maximum value of 26.39 in 1990 and a minimum value of 10.84 in 2002.

Definition: CO2 emissions from electricity and heat production is the sum of three IEA categories of CO2 emissions: (1) Main Activity Producer Electricity and Heat which contains the sum of emissions from main activity producer electricity generation, combined heat and power generation and heat plants. Main activity producers (formerly known as public utilities) are defined as those undertakings whose primary activity is to supply the public. They may be publicly or privately owned. This corresponds to IPCC Source/Sink Category 1 A 1 a. For the CO2 emissions from fuel combustion (summary) file, emissions from own on-site use of fuel in power plants (EPOWERPLT) are also included. (2) Unallocated Autoproducers which contains the emissions from the generation of electricity and/or heat by autoproducers. Autoproducers are defined as undertakings that generate electricity and/or heat, wholly or partly for their own use as an activity which supports their primary activity. They may be privately or publicly owned. In the 1996 IPCC Guidelines, these emissions would normally be distributed between industry, transport and "other" sectors. (3) Other Energy Industries contains emissions from fuel combusted in petroleum refineries, for the manufacture of solid fuels, coal mining, oil and gas extraction and other energy-producing industries. This corresponds to the IPCC Source/Sink Categories 1 A 1 b and 1 A 1 c. According to the 1996 IPCC Guidelines, emissions from coke inputs to blast furnaces can either be counted here or in the Industrial Processes source/sink category. Within detailed sectoral calculations, certain non-energy processes can be distinguished. In the reduction of iron in a blast furnace through the combustion of coke, the primary purpose of the coke oxidation is to produce pig iron and the emissions can be considered as an industrial process. Care must be taken not to double count these emissions in both Energy and Industrial Processes. In the IEA estimations, these emissions have been included in this category.

Source: IEA Statistics © OECD/IEA, http://www.iea.org/stats/index.asp), International Energy Agency electronic files on CO2 Emissions from Fuel Combustion.

See also:

Year Value
1990 26.39
1991 24.12
1992 19.07
1993 13.99
1994 13.68
1995 11.86
1996 12.45
1997 12.45
1998 12.03
1999 11.66
2000 11.18
2001 10.99
2002 10.84
2003 12.66
2004 12.66
2005 12.70
2006 11.38
2007 14.72
2008 13.35
2009 11.13
2010 14.85

CO2 emissions from electricity and heat production, total (% of total fuel combustion)

CO2 emissions from electricity and heat production, total (% of total fuel combustion) in Estonia was 80.40 as of 2010. Its highest value over the past 20 years was 81.15 in 1992, while its lowest value was 72.88 in 2001.

Definition: CO2 emissions from electricity and heat production is the sum of three IEA categories of CO2 emissions: (1) Main Activity Producer Electricity and Heat which contains the sum of emissions from main activity producer electricity generation, combined heat and power generation and heat plants. Main activity producers (formerly known as public utilities) are defined as those undertakings whose primary activity is to supply the public. They may be publicly or privately owned. This corresponds to IPCC Source/Sink Category 1 A 1 a. For the CO2 emissions from fuel combustion (summary) file, emissions from own on-site use of fuel in power plants (EPOWERPLT) are also included. (2) Unallocated Autoproducers which contains the emissions from the generation of electricity and/or heat by autoproducers. Autoproducers are defined as undertakings that generate electricity and/or heat, wholly or partly for their own use as an activity which supports their primary activity. They may be privately or publicly owned. In the 1996 IPCC Guidelines, these emissions would normally be distributed between industry, transport and "other" sectors. (3) Other Energy Industries contains emissions from fuel combusted in petroleum refineries, for the manufacture of solid fuels, coal mining, oil and gas extraction and other energy-producing industries. This corresponds to the IPCC Source/Sink Categories 1 A 1 b and 1 A 1 c. According to the 1996 IPCC Guidelines, emissions from coke inputs to blast furnaces can either be counted here or in the Industrial Processes source/sink category. Within detailed sectoral calculations, certain non-energy processes can be distinguished. In the reduction of iron in a blast furnace through the combustion of coke, the primary purpose of the coke oxidation is to produce pig iron and the emissions can be considered as an industrial process. Care must be taken not to double count these emissions in both Energy and Industrial Processes. In the IEA estimations, these emissions have been included in this category.

Source: IEA Statistics © OECD/IEA, http://www.iea.org/stats/index.asp), International Energy Agency electronic files on CO2 Emissions from Fuel Combustion.

See also:

Year Value
1990 73.06
1991 75.07
1992 81.15
1993 77.81
1994 77.03
1995 73.71
1996 73.41
1997 75.23
1998 75.19
1999 78.31
2000 76.47
2001 72.88
2002 74.15
2003 76.45
2004 75.76
2005 75.28
2006 73.32
2007 76.43
2008 75.38
2009 75.92
2010 80.40

CO2 emissions from manufacturing industries and construction (million metric tons)

The value for CO2 emissions from manufacturing industries and construction (million metric tons) in Estonia was 0.82 as of 2010. As the graph below shows, over the past 20 years this indicator reached a maximum value of 4.55 in 1990 and a minimum value of 0.82 in 2010.

Definition: CO2 emissions from manufacturing industries and construction contains the emissions from combustion of fuels in industry. The IPCC Source/Sink Category 1 A 2 includes these emissions. However, in the 1996 IPCC Guidelines, the IPCC category also includes emissions from industry autoproducers that generate electricity and/or heat. The IEA data are not collected in a way that allows the energy consumption to be split by specific end-use and therefore, autoproducers are shown as a separate item (Unallocated Autoproducers). Manufacturing industries and construction also includes emissions from coke inputs into blast furnaces, which may be reported either in the transformation sector, the industry sector or the separate IPCC Source/Sink Category 2, Industrial Processes.

Source: IEA Statistics © OECD/IEA, http://www.iea.org/stats/index.asp), International Energy Agency electronic files on CO2 Emissions from Fuel Combustion.

See also:

Year Value
1990 4.55
1991 3.36
1992 2.10
1993 1.87
1994 1.82
1995 2.13
1996 2.15
1997 1.75
1998 1.59
1999 1.05
2000 1.21
2001 1.38
2002 1.00
2003 1.15
2004 1.29
2005 1.32
2006 1.23
2007 1.52
2008 1.41
2009 0.85
2010 0.82

CO2 emissions from manufacturing industries and construction (% of total fuel combustion)

CO2 emissions from manufacturing industries and construction (% of total fuel combustion) in Estonia was 4.44 as of 2010. Its highest value over the past 20 years was 13.24 in 1995, while its lowest value was 4.44 in 2010.

Definition: CO2 emissions from manufacturing industries and construction contains the emissions from combustion of fuels in industry. The IPCC Source/Sink Category 1 A 2 includes these emissions. However, in the 1996 IPCC Guidelines, the IPCC category also includes emissions from industry autoproducers that generate electricity and/or heat. The IEA data are not collected in a way that allows the energy consumption to be split by specific end-use and therefore, autoproducers are shown as a separate item (Unallocated Autoproducers). Manufacturing industries and construction also includes emissions from coke inputs into blast furnaces, which may be reported either in the transformation sector, the industry sector or the separate IPCC Source/Sink Category 2, Industrial Processes.

Source: IEA Statistics © OECD/IEA, http://www.iea.org/stats/index.asp), International Energy Agency electronic files on CO2 Emissions from Fuel Combustion.

See also:

Year Value
1990 12.60
1991 10.46
1992 8.94
1993 10.40
1994 10.25
1995 13.24
1996 12.68
1997 10.57
1998 9.94
1999 7.05
2000 8.28
2001 9.15
2002 6.84
2003 6.94
2004 7.72
2005 7.82
2006 7.93
2007 7.89
2008 7.96
2009 5.80
2010 4.44

CO2 emissions from other sectors, excluding residential buildings and commercial and public services (million metric tons)

The value for CO2 emissions from other sectors, excluding residential buildings and commercial and public services (million metric tons) in Estonia was 0.22 as of 2010. As the graph below shows, over the past 20 years this indicator reached a maximum value of 1.38 in 1990 and a minimum value of 0.08 in 1999.

Definition: CO2 emissions from other sectors, less residential buildings and commercial and public services, contains the emissions from commercial/institutional activities, residential, agriculture/forestry, fishing and other emissions not specified elsewhere that are included in the IPCC Source/Sink Categories 1 A 4 and 1 A 5. In the 1996 IPCC Guidelines, the category also includes emissions from autoproducers in the commercial/residential/agricultural sectors that generate electricity and/or heat. The IEA data are not collected in a way that allows the energy consumption to be split by specific end-use and therefore, autoproducers are shown as a separate item (Unallocated Autoproducers).

Source: IEA Statistics © OECD/IEA, http://www.iea.org/stats/index.asp), International Energy Agency electronic files on CO2 Emissions from Fuel Combustion.

See also:

Year Value
1990 1.38
1991 1.06
1992 0.56
1993 0.42
1994 0.31
1995 0.19
1996 0.22
1997 0.17
1998 0.18
1999 0.08
2000 0.10
2001 0.23
2002 0.26
2003 0.27
2004 0.25
2005 0.24
2006 0.20
2007 0.22
2008 0.23
2009 0.22
2010 0.22

CO2 emissions from other sectors, excluding residential buildings and commercial and public services (% of total fuel combustion)

CO2 emissions from other sectors, excluding residential buildings and commercial and public services (% of total fuel combustion) in Estonia was 1.19 as of 2010. Its highest value over the past 20 years was 3.82 in 1990, while its lowest value was 0.54 in 1999.

Definition: CO2 emissions from other sectors, less residential buildings and commercial and public services, contains the emissions from commercial/institutional activities, residential, agriculture/forestry, fishing and other emissions not specified elsewhere that are included in the IPCC Source/Sink Categories 1 A 4 and 1 A 5. In the 1996 IPCC Guidelines, the category also includes emissions from autoproducers in the commercial/residential/agricultural sectors that generate electricity and/or heat. The IEA data are not collected in a way that allows the energy consumption to be split by specific end-use and therefore, autoproducers are shown as a separate item (Unallocated Autoproducers).

Source: IEA Statistics © OECD/IEA, http://www.iea.org/stats/index.asp), International Energy Agency electronic files on CO2 Emissions from Fuel Combustion.

See also:

Year Value
1990 3.82
1991 3.30
1992 2.38
1993 2.34
1994 1.75
1995 1.18
1996 1.30
1997 1.03
1998 1.13
1999 0.54
2000 0.68
2001 1.53
2002 1.78
2003 1.63
2004 1.50
2005 1.42
2006 1.29
2007 1.14
2008 1.30
2009 1.50
2010 1.19

CO2 emissions from transport (million metric tons)

The value for CO2 emissions from transport (million metric tons) in Estonia was 2.23 as of 2010. As the graph below shows, over the past 20 years this indicator reached a maximum value of 2.41 in 2007 and a minimum value of 1.08 in 1992.

Definition: CO2 emissions from transport contains emissions from the combustion of fuel for all transport activity, regardless of the sector, except for international marine bunkers and international aviation. This includes domestic aviation, domestic navigation, road, rail and pipeline transport, and corresponds to IPCC Source/Sink Category 1 A 3. In addition, the IEA data are not collected in a way that allows the autoproducer consumption to be split by specific end-use and therefore, autoproducers are shown as a separate item (Unallocated Autoproducers).

Source: IEA Statistics © OECD/IEA, http://www.iea.org/stats/index.asp), International Energy Agency electronic files on CO2 Emissions from Fuel Combustion.

See also:

Year Value
1990 2.36
1991 2.16
1992 1.08
1993 1.16
1994 1.39
1995 1.39
1996 1.51
1997 1.55
1998 1.64
1999 1.64
2000 1.63
2001 1.95
2002 2.06
2003 1.98
2004 2.02
2005 2.12
2006 2.28
2007 2.41
2008 2.34
2009 2.11
2010 2.23

CO2 emissions from transport (% of total fuel combustion)

CO2 emissions from transport (% of total fuel combustion) in Estonia was 12.07 as of 2010. Its highest value over the past 20 years was 14.69 in 2006, while its lowest value was 4.60 in 1992.

Definition: CO2 emissions from transport contains emissions from the combustion of fuel for all transport activity, regardless of the sector, except for international marine bunkers and international aviation. This includes domestic aviation, domestic navigation, road, rail and pipeline transport, and corresponds to IPCC Source/Sink Category 1 A 3. In addition, the IEA data are not collected in a way that allows the autoproducer consumption to be split by specific end-use and therefore, autoproducers are shown as a separate item (Unallocated Autoproducers).

Source: IEA Statistics © OECD/IEA, http://www.iea.org/stats/index.asp), International Energy Agency electronic files on CO2 Emissions from Fuel Combustion.

See also:

Year Value
1990 6.53
1991 6.72
1992 4.60
1993 6.45
1994 7.83
1995 8.64
1996 8.90
1997 9.37
1998 10.25
1999 11.01
2000 11.15
2001 12.93
2002 14.09
2003 11.96
2004 12.09
2005 12.57
2006 14.69
2007 12.51
2008 13.21
2009 14.39
2010 12.07

Classification

Topic: Environment Indicators

Sub-Topic: Emissions