Birth rate, crude (per 1,000 people) - Country Ranking - Europe

Definition: Crude birth rate indicates the number of live births occurring during the year, per 1,000 population estimated at midyear. Subtracting the crude death rate from the crude birth rate provides the rate of natural increase, which is equal to the rate of population change in the absence of migration.

Source: (1) United Nations Population Division. World Population Prospects, (2) Census reports and other statistical publications from national statistical offices, (3) Eurostat: Demographic Statistics, (4) United Nations Statistical Division. Population and Vital Statistics Reprot (various years), (5) U.S. Census Bureau: International Database, and (6) Secretariat of the Pacific Community: Statistics and Demography Programme.

See also: Thematic map, Time series comparison

Find indicator:
Rank Country Value Year
1 Monaco 25.00 2004
2 Turkey 16.49 2015
3 Ireland 14.45 2015
4 Albania 13.63 2015
5 Iceland 13.20 2015
6 United Kingdom 12.55 2015
7 Sweden 12.16 2015
8 France 12.15 2015
9 Belarus 11.80 2015
10 Norway 11.78 2015
11 Belgium 11.52 2015
12 Montenegro 11.44 2015
13 Luxembourg 11.43 2015
14 Macedonia 11.26 2015
15 Cyprus 11.21 2015
16 Ukraine 10.82 2015
17 Estonia 10.74 2015
18 Finland 10.66 2015
19 Moldova 10.57 2015
20 Slovak Republic 10.51 2015
21 Netherlands 10.48 2015
22 Denmark 10.42 2015
23 Slovenia 10.41 2015
24 Switzerland 10.39 2015
25 Lithuania 10.28 2015
26 Serbia 10.21 2015
27 Czech Republic 10.14 2015
28 Latvia 10.03 2015
29 Poland 10.02 2015
30 Liechtenstein 9.90 2014
31 Austria 9.62 2015
32 Andorra 9.50 2012
33 Croatia 9.48 2015
34 Bulgaria 9.46 2015
35 Hungary 9.34 2015
36 Romania 9.17 2015
37 San Marino 9.10 2014
38 Malta 8.92 2015
39 Spain 8.90 2015
40 Bosnia and Herzegovina 8.82 2015
41 Germany 8.51 2015
42 Greece 8.39 2015
43 Italy 8.38 2015
44 Portugal 7.98 2015

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Limitations and Exceptions: Vital registers are the preferred source for these data, but in many developing countries systems for registering births and deaths are absent or incomplete because of deficiencies in the coverage of events or geographic areas. Many developing countries carry out special household surveys that ask respondents about recent births and deaths. Estimates derived in this way are subject to sampling errors and recall errors.

Statistical Concept and Methodology: Vital rates are based on data from birth and death registration systems, censuses, and sample surveys by national statistical offices and other organizations, or on demographic analysis. Data for the most recent year for some high-income countries are provisional estimates based on vital registers. The estimates for many countries are projections based on extrapolations of levels and trends from earlier years or interpolations of population estimates and projections from the United Nations Population Division.

Aggregation method: Weighted average

Periodicity: Annual