Brazil - Birth rate, crude (per 1,000 people)

The value for Birth rate, crude (per 1,000 people) in Brazil was 14.41 as of 2015. As the graph below shows, over the past 55 years this indicator reached a maximum value of 42.34 in 1960 and a minimum value of 14.41 in 2015.

Definition: Crude birth rate indicates the number of live births occurring during the year, per 1,000 population estimated at midyear. Subtracting the crude death rate from the crude birth rate provides the rate of natural increase, which is equal to the rate of population change in the absence of migration.

Source: (1) United Nations Population Division. World Population Prospects, (2) Census reports and other statistical publications from national statistical offices, (3) Eurostat: Demographic Statistics, (4) United Nations Statistical Division. Population and Vita

See also:

Year Value
1960 42.34
1961 42.03
1962 41.61
1963 41.06
1964 40.39
1965 39.61
1966 38.74
1967 37.83
1968 36.93
1969 36.08
1970 35.31
1971 34.65
1972 34.11
1973 33.68
1974 33.34
1975 33.08
1976 32.89
1977 32.73
1978 32.56
1979 32.35
1980 32.06
1981 31.66
1982 31.14
1983 30.51
1984 29.78
1985 28.98
1986 28.13
1987 27.28
1988 26.45
1989 25.68
1990 24.98
1991 24.37
1992 23.84
1993 23.37
1994 22.94
1995 22.54
1996 22.14
1997 21.72
1998 21.26
1999 20.75
2000 20.20
2001 19.62
2002 19.02
2003 18.42
2004 17.85
2005 17.31
2006 16.83
2007 16.41
2008 16.05
2009 15.75
2010 15.49
2011 15.27
2012 15.06
2013 14.85
2014 14.64
2015 14.41

Limitations and Exceptions: Vital registers are the preferred source for these data, but in many developing countries systems for registering births and deaths are absent or incomplete because of deficiencies in the coverage of events or geographic areas. Many developing countries carry out special household surveys that ask respondents about recent births and deaths. Estimates derived in this way are subject to sampling errors and recall errors.

Statistical Concept and Methodology: Vital rates are based on data from birth and death registration systems, censuses, and sample surveys by national statistical offices and other organizations, or on demographic analysis. Data for the most recent year for some high-income countries are provisional estimates based on vital registers. The estimates for many countries are projections based on extrapolations of levels and trends from earlier years or interpolations of population estimates and projections from the United Nations Population Division.

Aggregation method: Weighted average

Periodicity: Annual

Classification

Topic: Health Indicators

Sub-Topic: Population