Thailand - Military expenditure

Military expenditure (current LCU)

The value for Military expenditure (current LCU) in Thailand was 196,462,000,000 as of 2015. As the graph below shows, over the past 27 years this indicator reached a maximum value of 196,462,000,000 in 2015 and a minimum value of 45,756,750,000 in 1988.

Definition: Military expenditures data from SIPRI are derived from the NATO definition, which includes all current and capital expenditures on the armed forces, including peacekeeping forces; defense ministries and other government agencies engaged in defense projects; paramilitary forces, if these are judged to be trained and equipped for military operations; and military space activities. Such expenditures include military and civil personnel, including retirement pensions of military personnel and social services for personnel; operation and maintenance; procurement; military research and development; and military aid (in the military expenditures of the donor country). Excluded are civil defense and current expenditures for previous military activities, such as for veterans' benefits, demobilization, conversion, and destruction of weapons. This definition cannot be applied for all countries, however, since that would require much more detailed information than is available about what is included in military budgets and off-budget military expenditure items. (For example, military budgets might or might not cover civil defense, reserves and auxiliary forces, police and paramilitary forces, dual-purpose forces such as military and civilian police, military grants in kind, pensions for military personnel, and social security contributions paid by one part of government to another.)

Source: Stockholm International Peace Research Institute (SIPRI), Yearbook: Armaments, Disarmament and International Security.

Year Value
1988 45,756,750,000
1989 49,854,000,000
1990 56,646,750,000
1991 66,301,250,000
1992 75,229,250,000
1993 79,916,250,000
1994 90,820,000,000
1995 95,899,250,000
1996 99,800,750,000
1997 102,398,000,000
1998 87,278,250,000
1999 77,777,000,000
2000 75,450,670,000
2001 76,636,130,000
2002 77,886,370,000
2003 78,468,970,000
2004 75,092,700,000
2005 79,816,500,000
2006 92,504,700,000
2007 121,595,000,000
2008 148,777,000,000
2009 164,560,000,000
2010 157,238,000,000
2011 168,100,000,000
2012 170,706,000,000
2013 181,323,000,000
2014 186,102,000,000
2015 196,462,000,000

Military expenditure (% of GDP)

Military expenditure (% of GDP) in Thailand was 1.42 as of 2014. Its highest value over the past 26 years was 2.93 in 1988, while its lowest value was 1.05 in 2005.

Definition: Military expenditures data from SIPRI are derived from the NATO definition, which includes all current and capital expenditures on the armed forces, including peacekeeping forces; defense ministries and other government agencies engaged in defense projects; paramilitary forces, if these are judged to be trained and equipped for military operations; and military space activities. Such expenditures include military and civil personnel, including retirement pensions of military personnel and social services for personnel; operation and maintenance; procurement; military research and development; and military aid (in the military expenditures of the donor country). Excluded are civil defense and current expenditures for previous military activities, such as for veterans' benefits, demobilization, conversion, and destruction of weapons. This definition cannot be applied for all countries, however, since that would require much more detailed information than is available about what is included in military budgets and off-budget military expenditure items. (For example, military budgets might or might not cover civil defense, reserves and auxiliary forces, police and paramilitary forces, dual-purpose forces such as military and civilian police, military grants in kind, pensions for military personnel, and social security contributions paid by one part of government to another.)

Source: Stockholm International Peace Research Institute (SIPRI), Yearbook: Armaments, Disarmament and International Security.

See also:

Year Value
1988 2.93
1989 2.68
1990 2.59
1991 2.65
1992 2.66
1993 2.45
1994 2.46
1995 2.27
1996 2.15
1997 2.17
1998 1.86
1999 1.62
2000 1.49
2001 1.43
2002 1.35
2003 1.24
2004 1.08
2005 1.05
2006 1.10
2007 1.34
2008 1.53
2009 1.70
2010 1.46
2011 1.49
2012 1.38
2013 1.40
2014 1.42

Military expenditure (% of central government expenditure)

Military expenditure (% of central government expenditure) in Thailand was 7.46 as of 2013. Its highest value over the past 23 years was 23.10 in 1992, while its lowest value was 6.69 in 2002.

Definition: Military expenditures data from SIPRI are derived from the NATO definition, which includes all current and capital expenditures on the armed forces, including peacekeeping forces; defense ministries and other government agencies engaged in defense projects; paramilitary forces, if these are judged to be trained and equipped for military operations; and military space activities. Such expenditures include military and civil personnel, including retirement pensions of military personnel and social services for personnel; operation and maintenance; procurement; military research and development; and military aid (in the military expenditures of the donor country). Excluded are civil defense and current expenditures for previous military activities, such as for veterans' benefits, demobilization, conversion, and destruction of weapons. This definition cannot be applied for all countries, however, since that would require much more detailed information than is available about what is included in military budgets and off-budget military expenditure items. (For example, military budgets might or might not cover civil defense, reserves and auxiliary forces, police and paramilitary forces, dual-purpose forces such as military and civilian police, military grants in kind, pensions for military personnel, and social security contributions paid by one part of government to another.)

Source: Stockholm International Peace Research Institute (SIPRI), Yearbook: Armaments, Disarmament and International Security.

See also:

Year Value
1990 22.03
1991 22.68
1992 23.10
1993 21.60
1994 21.93
1995 21.04
1996 19.24
1997 16.43
1998 11.28
1999 8.31
2000 11.02
2001 9.11
2002 6.69
2003 8.36
2004 6.97
2005 6.84
2006 7.31
2007 8.09
2008 8.98
2009 9.25
2010 8.52
2011 8.04
2012 7.57
2013 7.46

Classification

Topic: Public Sector Indicators

Sub-Topic: Defense & arms trade