Share of youth not in education, employment or training, male (% of male youth population) - Country Ranking

Definition: Share of youth not in education, employment or training (NEET) is the proportion of young people who are not in education, employment, or training to the population of the corresponding age group: youth (ages 15 to 24); persons ages 15 to 29; or both age groups.

Source: International Labour Organization, Key Indicators of the Labour Market database.

See also: Thematic map, Time series comparison

Find indicator:
Rank Country Value Year
1 Venezuela 60.92 2012
2 Trinidad and Tobago 46.06 2013
3 Armenia 39.23 2013
4 Samoa 38.90 2012
5 Moldova 31.42 2013
6 Albania 29.26 2013
7 South Africa 28.77 2014
8 Tajikistan 24.80 2007
8 Yemen 24.80 2010
10 Jamaica 24.30 2013
11 Macedonia 23.63 2014
12 Tanzania 23.50 2013
13 Sudan 23.17 2008
14 Italy 22.68 2014
15 Zambia 22.10 2012
16 Iran 21.96 2010
17 Croatia 21.89 2014
18 Tunisia 21.20 2013
19 Serbia 19.50 2013
20 Bulgaria 19.19 2014
21 Cyprus 18.99 2014
22 Greece 18.68 2014
23 Spain 18.00 2014
24 Indonesia 17.73 2013
25 Philippines 17.71 2012
26 Korea 17.40 2011
27 Egypt 17.27 2013
28 Belize 17.02 2012
29 Uruguay 16.55 2013
30 Ukraine 16.24 2014
31 Honduras 15.76 2010
32 United States 15.63 2012
33 Sri Lanka 15.62 2010
34 Romania 15.34 2014
35 Jordan 15.20 2012
36 Benin 15.00 2012
37 Dominican Republic 14.97 2013
38 Ireland 14.93 2014
39 Azerbaijan 14.70 2005
40 Turkey 14.62 2014
41 Israel 14.61 2013
42 Bangladesh 14.40 2013
43 Brazil 13.59 2013
44 Argentina 13.50 2012
44 Singapore 13.50 2010
46 Canada 13.41 2013
47 Kyrgyz Republic 13.17 2013
48 Guatemala 12.81 2013
49 Liberia 12.80 2012
50 Slovak Republic 12.77 2014
51 Belgium 12.58 2014
52 Costa Rica 12.42 2012
53 Colombia 12.40 2013
54 Portugal 12.29 2014
55 Hungary 12.01 2014
56 Poland 11.99 2014
57 Finland 11.84 2014
58 Estonia 11.75 2014
59 Peru 11.49 2013
60 Algeria 11.40 2014
61 Latvia 11.28 2014
62 Nicaragua 11.04 2005
63 France 11.00 2014
64 Mali 10.70 2010
65 United Kingdom 10.68 2014
66 Belarus 10.50 2009
67 Malta 9.94 2014
68 Russia 9.71 2012
69 Slovenia 9.66 2014
70 Lithuania 9.51 2014
71 Mexico 9.27 2012
72 Australia 9.22 2012
73 Thailand 9.18 2014
74 Malawi 9.10 2012
75 New Zealand 8.92 2013
76 Panama 8.87 2012
77 Rwanda 8.59 2008
78 Switzerland 8.17 2014
79 Austria 7.97 2014
80 Luxembourg 7.83 2014
81 Saudi Arabia 7.69 2013
82 Sweden 7.51 2014
83 Mozambique 7.36 2012
84 El Salvador 7.13 2013
84 Hong Kong SAR, China 7.13 2013
86 Vietnam 7.12 2013
87 Chile 6.74 2010
88 Czech Republic 6.45 2014
89 Nepal 6.20 2013
90 Denmark 6.19 2014
91 Iceland 6.07 2014
92 Togo 5.70 2012
93 Macao SAR, China 5.59 2013
94 Norway 5.55 2014
95 Germany 5.54 2014
96 Cambodia 4.80 2012
97 Cameroon 4.68 2010
98 Netherlands 4.57 2014
99 Paraguay 4.53 2012
100 Bolivia 3.74 2009
101 Ecuador 3.73 2013
102 India 3.49 2010
103 Uganda 3.31 2013
104 Qatar 2.86 2009
105 Japan 2.70 2013
106 Madagascar 2.50 2013
107 Mongolia 1.54 2013
108 Malaysia 0.90 2013
109 Ethiopia 0.44 2012

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Development Relevance: Unemployment and total employment are the broadest indicators of economic activity as reflected by the labor market. The International Labour Organization(ILO) defines the unemployed as members of the economically active population who are without work but available for and seeking work, including people who have lost their jobs or who have voluntarily left work. Some unemployment is unavoidable. At any time some workers are temporarily unemployed - between jobs as employers look for the right workers and workers search for better jobs. Such unemployment, often called frictional unemployment, results from the normal operation of labor markets. Youth unemployment is an important policy issue for many economies. Young men and women today face increasing uncertainty in their hopes of undergoing a satisfactory transition in the labour market, and this uncertainty and disillusionment can, in turn, have damaging effects on individuals, communities, economies and society at large. Unemployed or underemployed youth are less able to contribute effectively to national development and have fewer opportunities to exercise their rights as citizens. They have less to spend as consumers, less to invest as savers and often have no "voice" to bring about change in their lives and communities. Widespread youth unemployment and underemployment also prevents companies and countries from innovating and developing competitive advantages based on human capital investment, thus undermining future prospects. The NEET group is particularly at risk of both labour market and social exclusion, because this group is neither improving their future employability through investment in skills nor gaining experience through employment, . In addition, the NEET group is already in a disadvantaged position due to lower levels of education and lower household incomes. In view of the fact that the NEET group includes unemployed youth as well as economically inactive youth, the NEET rate provides important complementray information to labour force participation rates and unemploymenent rates. For example, if youth participation rates decrease during an economic downturn due to discouragement, this may be reflected in an upward movement in the NEET rate. More generally, a high NEET rate and a low youth unemployment may indicate significant discouragement of young people. A high NEET rate for young women suggests their engagement in household chores, and/or the presence of strong institutional barriers limiting female participation in labour markets.

Limitations and Exceptions: Data should be used cautiously because of differences in age coverage.

Statistical Concept and Methodology: The standard definition of unemployed persons is those individuals without work in a recent past period, and currently available for and seeking for employment. But there may be persons who do not actively "seek" work because they view job opportunities as limited, or because they have restricted labour mobility, or face discrimination, or structural, social or cultural barriers. NEET rates capture more broadly untapped potential youth, including such individuals who want to work but are not seeking work (often called the "hidden unemployed" or "discouraged workers"). Youth are defined as persons ages 15 to 24; young adults are those ages 25 to 29; and adults are those ages 25 and above. However, countries vary somewhat in their operational definitions. In particular, the lower age limit for young people is usually determined by the minimum age for leaving school, where this exists.

Aggregation method: Weighted average

Periodicity: Annual

General Comments: When NEET rates are available for more than two age groups in a given year, one value for persons ages 15 to 29 is taken, considering that not all people complete their education by the age of 24.