Domestic credit provided by financial sector (% of GDP)

Definition: Domestic credit provided by the financial sector includes all credit to various sectors on a gross basis, with the exception of credit to the central government, which is net. The financial sector includes monetary authorities and deposit money banks, as well as other financial corporations where data are available (including corporations that do not accept transferable deposits but do incur such liabilities as time and savings deposits). Examples of other financial corporations are finance and leasing companies, money lenders, insurance corporations, pension funds, and foreign exchange companies.

Description: The map below shows how Domestic credit provided by financial sector (% of GDP) varies by country. The shade of the country corresponds to the magnitude of the indicator. The darker the shade, the higher the value. The country with the highest value in the world is Japan, with a value of 373.79. The country with the lowest value in the world is Libya, with a value of -42.00.

Source: International Monetary Fund, International Financial Statistics and data files, and World Bank and OECD GDP estimates.

See also: Country ranking, Time series comparison

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Development Relevance: Both banking and financial systems enhance growth, the main factor in poverty reduction. At low levels of economic development commercial banks tend to dominate the financial system, while at higher levels domestic stock markets tend to become more active and efficient. The size and mobility of international capital flows make it increasingly important to monitor the strength of financial systems. Robust financial systems can increase economic activity and welfare, but instability can disrupt financial activity and impose widespread costs on the economy.

Limitations and Exceptions: In a few countries governments may hold international reserves as deposits in the banking system rather than in the central bank. Since claims on the central government are a net item (claims on the central government minus central government deposits), the figure may be negative, resulting in a negative figure for domestic credit provided by the banking sector.

Statistical Concept and Methodology: Domestic credit provided by the financial sector as a share of GDP measures banking sector depth and financial sector development in terms of size. The data on domestic credit provided by the financial sector are taken from the financial corporations survey (line 52) of the International Monetary Fund's (IMF) International Financial Statistics or, when unavailable, from its depository corporations survey (line 32). The financial sector includes monetary authorities (the central bank) and deposit money banks, as well as other financial institutions where data are available (including institutions that do not accept transferable deposits but do incur such liabilities as time and savings deposits). Examples of other banking institutions are savings and mortgage loan institutions, finance companies, development banks, and building and loan associations.

Aggregation method: Weighted average

Periodicity: Annual